Living with Migraine Part 1

Migraine often occurs for the first time in your teens or early 20s. It is most common in the 30 to 40 age group. At least 90% of people with migraine experience a first attack before the age of 40. Generally it is true that migraine improves as we get into our 50s and 60s. Studies show 40% of people with migraine no longer have attacks by the age of 65. Before the menopause, three times as many women as men have migraine. After 60, when hormonal factors are less likely to play a role, twice as many women as men have migraine.

Let’s look ta some behavioural factors contribute to migraine :

  • Depression – About 40% of people with migraine also have depression. People with migraine are twice as likely to have considered suicide than people without migraine. More than 66% of people with bipolar disorder have migraine.
  • Sleep – Sleep disorders are common among people with migraine. More than two thirds of people with chronic migraine also have insomnia. Behavioural treatment for insomnia can help you get better sleep, and may help reduce your migraine frequency.
  • Anxiety – More than half of people with migraine will have at least one anxiety disorder during their lives.
  • Consistent Daily Schedule – Having a consistent mealtime, bedtime, and daily aerobic exercise are important for people with migraine. Staying consistent in these three areas has been associated with low attach frequency in people with migraine.
  • Taking Medication – Approximately half of people with migraine do not take their medications as recommended by their doctor. With preventive medications taken daily to reduce attach frequency. Fitting them into your daily routine is a good strategy.
  • Stress – Stress is the body’s automatic response to demands or challenges. 4 out of every 5 with migraine report stress as a trigger. Both increases and decrease in stress are associated with migraine attacks.

Tomorrow we will talk about the treatment options for these migraine causes. In the meantime, here are some relaxations tips for relieving your migraine > https://empress2inspire.blog/2020/07/08/daily-dose-of-nature-50/

Reference : https://americanheadachesociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Behavioral-Migraine.png

16 Comments Add yours

  1. Ryn says:

    Is this actually

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ryn says:

      I meant is this actually true

      Liked by 1 person

      1. GS says:

        Yes..why?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Ryn says:

        Because I didn’t know some of this and it is mind blowing because I have learnt quite a lot about it and didn’t know this

        Liked by 1 person

      3. GS says:

        One prevailing theory is that migraines are caused by rapid waves of brain cell activity crossing the cortex, the thin outer layer of brain tissue, followed by periods of no activity. The name for this phenomenon is cortical spreading depression.

        Cortical spreading depression makes sense as a cause of aura, but researchers have also linked it to headache. Proponents cite experimental evidence that suggests it sets off inflammatory and other processes that stimulate pain receptors on the trigeminal nerves. This “neurogenic” inflammation and the release of other factors make the receptors — and the parts of the brain that receive their signals — increasingly sensitive, so migraine becomes more likely.

        Some leading researchers have expressed doubt about whether migraines start with cortical spreading depression. Experimental drugs that inhibit cortical spreading depression have shown a preventive effect on aura, but not on migraine headache.

        So, say some researchers, migraines are best explained as beginning lower in the brain, in the brainstem, which controls basic functions, such as respiration and responses to pain, and modulates many others, including incoming sensory information. The theory is that if certain areas of the brainstem aren’t working properly or are easily excited, they’re capable of starting cascades of neurological events, including cortical spreading depression, that account for migraine’s multiple symptoms.

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Ryn says:

        Wow that’s interesting

        Liked by 1 person

  2. the greatvincent says:

    Can’t you write in advance cause this is a dangerous illness needs urgent attention

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mark Kent says:

    very well done for talking about migraines .i have 5 a day i will be Vomiting all over .long list health issues m.e. ibs list goes on. MARK

    Liked by 3 people

    1. GS says:

      Thank you Mark for stopping by and liking the post.

      Like

  4. Susan says:

    Migraines visited me occasionally about every 10 years until my 70s. They are a mystery to me.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Hmm stress could be a trigger. Looks like an episodic migraine alright the frequency is a little off. Episodic migraine (EM) is characterized by those with migraine who have 0 to 14 headache days per month, while chronic migraine (CM) is characterized by 15 or more headache days per month.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for the reblog.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Always a pleasure to share your posts with followers, Dear! Hope you are having a great weekend!
        xoxox 😘💕🎁🌹

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        Yes all well. Thank you 😊

        Liked by 1 person

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