Journal Prompts for Anxiety Part 1

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One anxious thought often leads to another, and then another, until the person is surrounded by these thoughts. It becomes difficult to revert to a worry-free state of mind once these anxious thoughts take over. In moments like this, journaling can help reduce anxiety. Studies have shown that writing about how a person feels has the potential to ease anxiety in people who have suffered from traumatic event.

Here are some journaling prompts for you :

  • Think back to a moment in your life when you failed and write about what you have learned from this experience.
  • Write about three greatest lessons you have been given by your anxiety.
  • Think of someone who has caused you pain. Write a letter to this person explaining that you forgive them. You can give this letter to them or just do it as an exercise for yourself.
  • Make a list of 10 things that always make you smile.
  • On a scale of 1-10 (1 being the worst and 10 being the best) what would you say your anxiety is right now.
  • Make a list of things that you like and don’t like about your body.
  • Write down your most recurring negative thoughts and the reasons why they keep repeating.

Reference : https://i.pinimg.com/236x/d5/f6/a8/d5f6a8f05a4a56ba8c4be1dca9c0e1d1.jpg

16 Comments Add yours

  1. caslee2000 says:

    Something that helps me is stream-of-consciousness writing. The process of taking every stray thought and jotting it down for ten minutes or so can really help me reset myself, and lessen my anxiety.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Journaling can reduce stress by serving as an escape or emotional release of negative thoughts and feelings. A 2011 study highlighted the positive impact journaling had on adolescents who struggled with worry and self-doubt before test taking.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. George says:

    Anxiety proves fatal to creativity. So fight that with the creative journal.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Long-term stress is literally killing the cells in your hippocampus that contribute to the deterioration of your memory. But it’s also zapping your creativity.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for the reblog

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Always a pleasure to read and share your posts with followers, My Dear!!
        πŸ˜ŠπŸ’•πŸŒΉβœ¨

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Really have to think about this. I get anxious when a problem arises and I can’t fix it immediately. The anxiety serves the purpose of keeping me vigilant to fix the situation but it also has negative health implications. Great post !

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Scientists have learned that some degree of stress or anxiety isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Good stress, something now referred to now as eustress, keeps us motivated and excited about life. 1ο»Ώ It appears that some degree of anxiety may have similar “silver linings.” Let’s take a look at what they’ve been learning.

      Like

      1. Interesting. I’d like to hear more. It seems all of these emotions and reactions are evolutionary adaptations that serve us, but can also hurt us. I’ve read that the human body can’t tell the difference between good and bad stress so I guess it’s better to work on controlling our responses.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        Positive stressors (called eustress) may include an upcoming wedding, the holidays, or pregnancy. On the other hand, negative stress (called distress) results in the full-blown stress response. If continuous, negative stress can lead to loss of productivity, health problems, and exhaustion.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thanks for the clarity there. It never ceases to amaze me how complex we and our bodies are. I went through some pretty negative stressors about 4 years ago – they hit all at once. And it seems like it has taken this long to recover. Thanks for your post and the conversation !

        Liked by 1 person

      4. GS says:

        We are complex beings that is for sure πŸ™πŸΌ

        Liked by 1 person

  4. ascott4321 says:

    I love this! I have been journaling about anything and everything but my anxiety! I think this will help me a lot thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Journaling Is a Great Tool for Coping With Anxiety. Journaling is a highly recommended stress management tool. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of journaling for health, happiness, and stress management. Way to go!!!

      Liked by 1 person

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