Practising Loving Kindness

What is Loving Kindness?

Loving kindness is a mindfulness practice designed to increase love and compassion first for ourselves and then for our loved ones, for friends, for those we are angry with, for difficult people, for enemies, and then for all beings. Loving kindness can protect us from developing and holding on to judgementalness, ill will, and hostile feelings towards ourselves and others.

Practising Loving Kindness

Practising living kindness is like saying a prayer for yourself or someone else. As when you are asking or praying for something for yourself or others, you actively send living and kind wishes, and recite in your mind words and phrases that express good will towards yourself and others.

Loving Kindness Instructions

  • Choose a person to send living kindness toward. Do not select a person you do not want to relate to with kindness and compassion. Start with yourself, or if this is too difficult, with a person you already love.
  • Sitting, standing, or lying down, begin by breathing slowly and deeply. Opening the palms of your hands, gently bring the person to mind.
  • Radiate loving kindness by reciting a set of warm wishes, such as “May I be happy,” “May I be at peace,” “May I be healthy,” “May I be safe,” or another set of positive wishes of your own. Repeat the script slowly, and focus on the meaning of each word as you say it in your mind. (If you have distracting thoughts, just notice them as they come and go and gently bring your mind back to your script). Continue until you feel yourself immersed in loving kindness.
  • Gradually work yourself up through loved ones, friends, those you are angry with, difficult people, enemies, and finally all beings. For example, use a script such as “May John be happy,” “May John be at peace,” and so on (of John, may you be happy,” “May you be at peace,” and so on), as you concentrate on radiating loving kindness to John.
  • Practice each day, starting with yourself and then moving to others.

Be loving and kind.

Reference : https://i.pinimg.com/originals/4a/19/26/4a1926d1f615edef4272988dd31f15ab.jpg

108 Comments Add yours

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. The best gift for the season. Thank you.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. GS says:

      Thank you. Glad you liked it. Loving kindness is the only way to live.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Carol anne says:

    Thanks for these instructions on how to practice loving kindness! I shall be doing more of this in 2021!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. GS says:

      Loving Kindness Meditation is about cultivating compassion and love through mentally repeating a series of phrases directed at someone you love, a neutral person, yourself, and then all living things. Ever wonder if repeating these Loving Kindness phrases, such as “May you be well”, “May you be happy”, “May you live with ease and in peace”, is really a productive use of your time? Turns out science now backs what Buddhists have long known about this powerful ancient practice. The incredible thing about Loving Kindness meditation is that a single short session of about 10 minutes, can kick-start a positive ripple effect, leading to increased feelings of social connection and positivity towards strangers. Loving Kindness Meditation also has continued benefits for those that practice more frequently. In fact, science suggests that the benefits can be surprisingly far reaching.

      Liked by 3 people

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for the reblog

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Always a pleasure to read and share your great posts with followers, My Dear!
        xoxox 😘💕🎁🌹✨

        Liked by 3 people

      2. GS says:

        🙌🏼🙌🏼

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Unique Tales says:

    I don’t have to practise it is Naturally in me to be kind, caring and compassionate.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. GS says:

      That’s awesome 👏🏼

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Unique Tales says:

    😊😊😊♥️

    Liked by 5 people

    1. GS says:

      ❤️❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  5. scubaviste says:

    Wise and motivating words. Merry Christmas!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. GS says:

      Merry Christmas

      Liked by 3 people

  6. Angie says:

    💯 love this ❤️

    Liked by 4 people

    1. GS says:

      Loving-Kindness Meditation packs a punch when it comes to health and happiness. Increases positive emotions and decreases negative emotions. Increases vagal tone which increases positive emotions and feelings of social connection. Decreases Migraines. Decreases Chronic Pain. Decreases PTSD.

      Liked by 3 people

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Angie says:

        Thank you for creating wonderful content to share 🥰

        Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Abrorfo says:

    This gift stays in our hearts forever

    Liked by 4 people

    1. GS says:

      It does. Loving kindness has an everlasting effect primarily because it is so hard to find these days.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Abrorfo says:

        The is going wrongly, it is up to us to change it

        Liked by 2 people

      2. GS says:

        Yes indeed. All of us have a role to play.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Abrorfo says:

        It is now or never

        Liked by 2 people

      4. GS says:

        Yes indeed 🙏🏼

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Stephen Kamutu says:

    Nice and motivational blog post. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Stephen Kamutu says:

    Nice and motivational blog post. I have found value in reading it and I would recommend more of this from you!!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. GS says:

      Thank you Stephen. I shall keep on writing.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      🙏🏼🙏🏼

      Like

  10. Abrorfo says:

    You are really interesting

    Liked by 2 people

  11. ribbonfairy_with_unboundedwords says:

    I don’t know if it’s a coincidence or fate but I really needed to read this post. I’m having issues with myself and with some people. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. GS says:

      Then I am glad you found this post.

      Some published studies have noted that this meditation technique may be useful in the management of social anxiety, marital conflict, anger, and coping with the strains of long-term caregiving.1 And other research has suggested that loving kindness meditation can enhance the activation of brain areas that are involved in emotional processing and empathy to boost a sense of positivity and reduce negativity.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. ribbonfairy_with_unboundedwords says:

        I hope it will help me too

        Liked by 2 people

      2. GS says:

        👍🏼👍🏼

        Like

  12. Inspiring post! Thank you for posting

    Liked by 3 people

    1. GS says:

      During loving kindness meditation, you focus benevolent and loving energy toward yourself and others. There are many well-documented benefits of traditional meditation, but as with other techniques, this form of meditation takes practice. It can be difficult and sometimes leads to resistance since the average person is not used to this level of giving and receiving love.

      Like

  13. LGC says:

    This is amazing well written

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Loving kindness meditation (LKM) is a popular self-care technique that can be used to boost well-being and reduce stress. Those who regularly practice loving kindness meditation are able to increase their capacity for forgiveness, connection to others, self-acceptance, and more. This technique is not easy as you are asking yourself to send kindness your way or to others. It often takes practice to allow yourself to receive your own love or to send it.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

  14. blogsabeera says:

    Thanks! I will try this surely

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Loving kindness (metta), a traditional Buddhist concept, implies acting with compassion toward all sentient beings, with an awareness and appreciation of the natural world. The giving of metta, an integral part of Buddhist medicine, has the potential to enhance modern primary health care. Metta must be given with selflessness (saydana), compassion (karuna), and sympathetic joy (mudita). For the believer, Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, is the Supreme Healer. His ancient but timeless message of metta is alive and well today, The Dalai Lama being it key proponent. The Buddhist system features several techniques, such as the Noble Eight-Fold-Path and the metta meditations, to keep physicians moving toward metta. One does not have to be a Buddhist to practice metta, or more humane medicine, and the notion of “tender loving care” is spreading in biomedical circles.

      Like

  15. Thank you for sharing this. It’s one of my favorite mindfulness practices – especially when feeling ground down by the work week!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Many of us try to find quick solutions on how to get peace in life. With meditation, we learn that stress is nothing but an illusion that comes from negativity and the more we practice love and kindness, the more peace we can actually find.

      With meditation, we figure out how to react less, and show self-compassion during harsh times. Instead of self-denigration, we can learn to put away shame and turn towards love and kindness. This is really important in cultivating a habit of letting go of things we simply cannot control. Then, you have the freedom from any kind of pain or frustration and bounce back, starting fresh.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Young Jang says:

    What a fabulous and helpful post!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Yes and its as simple as Carve out some quiet time for yourself (even a few minutes will work) and sit comfortably. Close your eyes, relax your muscles, and take a few deep breaths.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

  17. Sneha says:

    Reminds me of the phrase – have courage and be kind from the “Cinderella” movie.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Ah beautiful line..thank you for sharing Sneha

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Mark Hughes says:

    I do believe after the pandemic humanity needs to adopt mindfulness / meditation more. Our old ways of treating each other and ourselves are numbered.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Mindfulness and meditation practices translate well to different populations across the lifespan and range of ability. Introducing a mindfulness and meditation practice during this pandemic has the potential to complement treatment and is a low-cost beneficial method of providing support with anxiety for all.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Mark Hughes says:

        Totally! What holds most people back is discipline, it’s simply too much for a lot of people to just….sit and empty themselves!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        Cherishing yourself means doing the things that are good for your mind, body and soul. Whilst these things may go against your innate predilection for leisure and comfort, in the long run, they will help you achieve a sustained level of happiness.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Loving-kindness is meant to be done in the easiest way possible so that the experience springs forth most gently, most naturally. To do it in the most easiest way possible means first to use phrases that are personally meaningful. The traditional phrases as are taught, at least this one classical translation of them, begins with oneself:

      May I be free from danger, may I know safety. Danger in that sense is both inner danger from the force of certain mind states, and outer danger. So, May I be free from danger. May I have mental happiness. May I have physical happiness. May I have ease of well-being—which means may I not have to struggle terribly, day by day, with livelihood, with family issues.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Sudha Dhamo says:

    Mindfulness living and conscious practice of loving kindness – loved reading your post.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Thank you Sudha. Practising loving kindness has so many benefits. Increases positive emotions and decreases negative emotions. In a landmark study, Barbara Frederickson and her colleagues ( Fredrickson, Cohn, Coffey, Pek, & Finkel, 2008) found that practicing seven weeks of Loving-Kindness Meditation increased love, joy, contentment, gratitude, pride, hope, interest, amusement, and awe. These positive emotions then produced increases in a wide range of personal resources (e.g., increased mindfulness, purpose in life, social support, decreased illness symptoms), which, in turn, predicted increased life satisfaction and reduced depressive symptoms.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I totally agree with you and the rewards are wonderful too!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Kindness has power. Kind words and gestures offer potent healing and such acts go a long way. It is the absence of cruelty, intentional hurtfulness and ill will that is referred to as loving-kindness. The two aspects of this important virtue is loving-kindness and non-injury. Being kind involves being compassionate towards others physically, mentally and verbally.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. You said it so well…compassion is an integral part of loving-kindness.!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Compassion gives us the ability to understand someone else’s situation and the desire to take action to improve their lives. For people who are dependent on others for help and support, compassion is often the most important factor in allowing them to lead fulfilling lives.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Great post and something to practice for sure!

    Liked by 2 people

  23. 24 Money says:

    In fact loving kindness goes with tender mercy

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      “Remember, O LORD, thy tender mercies and thy lovingkindnesses; for they have been ever of old” (Psalm 25:6).

      These beautiful words, “tender mercies” and“lovingkindness,” may sound somewhat old-fashioned in today’s sophisticated jargon, but the divine attributes they represent have been “ever of old” and will continue to characterize our tender and merciful, kind and loving God of all grace forever. Dropping them from our conversation (even in most newer translations of the Bible) is a sad loss that, to some degree, has impoverished our speech and, perhaps, our souls.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing.

      Like

  24. jyoti batra says:

    Love , kindness and gratitude the virtues we need.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Kindness is certainly part of the nature of God, as the biblical Book of Psalms refers to God’s kindness more than 80 times. Kindness is not a duty or an ethic either; it is an expression of personal virtue that flows from and is rooted in love, which is at the heart of all virtue. Kindness begins in the heart. In fact, many languages have words that are translated as ‘loving-kindness’ or ‘kind-heartedness,’ which is kindness that goes beyond the minimum requirements of civility. Kindness is really more than being nice, polite or agreeable, but instead has more to do with our being than our behavior. It cannot be faked.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

  25. charity4w says:

    I enjoyed reading this post, I found that it makes it easier to love others when you pray for them. I am a Christian and a prayer warrior for as long as I can remember from the age of 2. My Lord and Savior has always answered my prayers. Prayer is a power weapon we have against the enemy. During these hard times many people do need to be encouraged, feel loved and need a friend to help them get through the hard times. I will reblog this post to help someone else so that they maybe blessed. Thank you for sharing 🙏🏼

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for the reblog. Include loving kindness in your prayer. Keeping your eyes closed, think of a person close to you who loves you very much. It could be someone from the past or the present; someone still in life or who has passed; it could be a spiritual teacher or guide. Imagine that person standing on your right side, sending you their love. That person is sending you wishes for your safety, for your well-being and happiness. Feel the warm wishes and love coming from that person towards you.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

  26. zubi says:

    This is really amazing dear. Thanks for such a beautiful post. And I’ll love if you’ll go through my feed. 😇

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Sure Zubi

      Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

  27. If we’ve ever needed more loving kindness in the world, it would be now. Thank you for your thoughtful post♥️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yes we need more kindness with the uncertainty in the world. When we express meaningful and intentional gratitude or engage in planned acts of kindness, we experience the benefits of serotonin and dopamine, which are two neurotransmitters responsible for us feeling pleasure or joy. Not only do we benefit others from this activity, but it has a way of recharging our batteries.

      Liked by 2 people

  28. Vanessa says:

    Thank you. I truly enjoyed this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Jack Kornfield says, “the rule in lovingkindness practice is to follow the way that most easily opens your heart.”

      Like

  29. littleoldladyinlavendersilk says:

    Just what I was commenting to Half-full_ all _good (MrLudlum?)
    No special name or gimmick needed. “The Golden Rule” in Christian culture; no doubt there are similar for other cultures. Boiled down to Love, every day 💕 — or the prayer of St, Francis.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Loving kindness is the key to everything.

      Like

  30. Reblogged this on Blazing Bibles and commented:
    Loving Kindness! Beautifully Spoken!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

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