Don’t Be Afraid Of Your Voice

Remember to take things slowly at first. I believe that taking smaller steps is more sustainable than taking a big leap when we are not ready. Yes, being ready begins with making a decision, but from there, it is accepting that it is a process rather than becoming frustrated with oneself. It’s committing to the process for however long it takes for us.

It may feel intimidating, and I completely understand. That feeling you get when you know you’re about to step outside of your comfort zone, and you can just feel your heart racing, and then when you try to get your words out, we feel like we’re mumbling and fumbling, and we walk away questioning how well we were received/what others perceptions were) is not a pleasant one.

That is why it is critical to focus on what went well afterward as well as simply giving ourselves a thumbs up for doing what scares us. Even if we wholeheartedly believe that “well, this could have gone better,” rather than viewing it as a source of criticism, consider it as something to remember for the next time.

If you’re afraid to be seen, if you’re afraid to be heard, then give these a try.

  • When you feel your nerves rising, take deep breaths (practising treating techniques on a daily basis can help us in moments when we can’t control our breathing and have a racing heart).
  • Attempt to walk slowly.
  • If you believe people will challenge you for using your voice, prepare assertive statements ahead of time.
  • Take it one conversation at a time; if you use your voice only once in each interaction, you’ll find that it becomes a habit you enjoy over time.
  • If you try to sound perfect, you’ll never put yourself out there.
  • Begin by practising in environments where you feel more at ease, and then progress to more difficult environments.
  • After that, instead of ruminating on “what you could have done better,” practise self-compassion and congratulate yourself on doing something that scares you.

What has your experience been when you have attempted to be seen or heard? Is it usually a pleasant or difficult experience? Let us help one another.

13 Comments Add yours

  1. dark sky says:

    I had a stage fear like that in first time i thought that it was it’s so easy but after standing on stage i understand what is feeling

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Happy to see you could relate to the post.

      Like

  2. Reaseaorg says:

    Great helpful tips for dealing with those nerves here. I find due to my introvert nature it takes a great deal of effort to ensure I get heard, which is something I have always had. I do still complete the tasks needed though, which I should remind myself of more.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Glad you found the post helpful

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Good Post. πŸ‘ From personal experience, we are trained as children. I can remember my parents telling me “children should been seen not heard” and perhaps that was fitting for the time as I was a child trying to talk at the table while the adults were. But that’s the beginning of what we need to break out of. As an adult, I believe we live in a society where people are attacked for stating their opinions. If you feel like you have a message that you want to get out there, keep speaking. Be persistent. It was Gandhi who said, “First they will laugh at you, then they’ll ignore you, and then they’ll fight you.” You’ll know when you’re onto something. Just keep going. πŸ’•

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Wonderful lines by Gandhi. Thank you very much for reminding me Frank. You stand your ground. You continue to work towards the cause. You are slowly known to people now. Some even start appreciating you. They join you because they’ve had these ideas and notions too, but they weren’t able to voice it earlier. You are the voice they’ve been waiting for.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Cheerui says:

    At the end of that first attempt, the temptation to focus on what didn’t go right rather than what went well is overwhelming….

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Ah we have all been there. But awareness is key to move onwards and upwards.

      Like

  5. Great tips. Very helpful for my social anxiety. But I feel like I need a practice buddy. Someone who will tell me when im doing something wrong and someone I can tell that im feeling very self conscious.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yes, having a buddy helps. You can also always journal your daily life, and review it weekly, it can be a great tool.!

      Like

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