Daily Dose of Nature

on

Celebrating Beltane

Beltane, the basis of May Day, is the traditional celebration that marks the beginning of summer and the abundance associated with the warmer months.

Beltane is the midpoint between the Spring Equinox and the Summer Solstice. It is called a “cross quarter” and is also a fire festival, celebrated around 1 May. The origins of the name are not clear, although “fire of Bel”, the bright or shining one, or simply “good fire” are reasonable suppositions.

Abundance of Spring

Beltane is at the peak of spring and the first hint of summer. What was set in motion at the Spring Equinox in the form of buds and shoots, as well as the seeds of ideas, is manifesting itself. Nature is abundant with flowers, the hawthorn tree drips with May blossom and everything is vibrant. At Beltane, male and female come together in unabashed sexuality. Young people would spend the night in the woods “a-maying” and married couples could abandon their vows for the night.

Beltane falls at the start of the May, a time of vibrant abundance in nature. These celebrations are the basis of May Day.

Beltane in the Modern World

Beltane marked the start of the summer and the beginning of the pastoral season and celebrations focused on sexuality, fertility and abundance. The Lord of the Greenwood and Queen of the May symbolises the divine union of male and female. The traditional maypole is a symbol of the make phallus and the female principle is represented by baskets and wreaths, while the weaving of red and white ribbons symbolises their interconnection.

Discover the magic of Gaia here > https://empress2inspire.blog/2021/01/25/daily-dose-of-nature-234/

Modern May Day

Nowadays we still have maypoles, but the male god has gone. Christianity kept the Queen of the May, but tan formed her into a symbol of virginity, purity and chastity. Beltane used to be a time when everyone, with their class or status suspended for a day, went “a-maying”. Thus, with May Day already associated with the masses, it was natural that May Day has become a modern-day worker’s holiday in many places around the world.

Reference : https://i.pinimg.com/originals/29/cc/9c/29cc9c9b73a58842a8e5729094b10ac9.jpg

13 Comments Add yours

  1. DiosRaw says:

    Fascinating. 🖤

    Liked by 3 people

    1. GS says:

      Yes Amber. More on this in our next series. I just have to find the time to start writing…lol

      Liked by 2 people

      1. DiosRaw says:

        Haha, awesome.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Thank you. Glad you liked the post.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Ryn says:

    Omg wow wow whoa awesome

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Fascinating !!!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Liked by 1 person

  3. richlakin says:

    Marc Bolan sings about the people of the Beltane in Ride a White Swan….

    Liked by 2 people

    1. GS says:

      Yes !!!

      The modern Beltane Fire Festival is inspired by the ancient Gaelic festival of Beltane which began on the evening before 1 May and marked the beginning of summer. The modern festival was started in 1988 by a small group of enthusiasts including the musical collective Test Dept, with academic support from the School of Scottish Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Since then the festival has grown, and now involves over 300 voluntary collaborators and performers with the available tickets often selling out.

      While the festival draws on a variety of historical, mythological and literary influences, the organisers do not claim it to be anything other than a modern celebration of Beltane, evolving with its participants. The purpose of our festival is not to recreate ancient practices but to continue in the spirit of our ancient forebears and create our own connection to the cycles of nature.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.