empress2inspire.wordpress.comInspiration

The Secret Of Staying Happy

At some points in life, it’s not possible — or at least not easy — to feel happy. However, even then, it’s sometimes possible to feel happier. By taking whatever steps you can manage to give yourself whatever happiness boost is possible, you give yourself a deeper reservoir to deal with your happiness challenge. Here are some strategies which happy people follow everyday to stay happy, why everyday, you say? because it is a habit that you have build, it is a natural state of being.

1.They Practice Self -Care : It is easy to fall into a spell of procrastination and put off an appointment with you doctor or beautician because you are too busy, but self-care is crucial to your well being. Taking care of your body means loving yourself as a person – it goes way beyond aesthetics. Self-care can be as simple as splurging on a new bag or sleeping in for an extra 15 minutes in the morning. 

2. They are Open Minded : A happy person is always open to life and to what is can offer. It is important to have values and principles, but it is also crucial to stay open to change your mind and discover new things because openness and curiosity allow you to grow and evolve. Try to look at the world from a different perspective, or find a new hobby. 

3. They are Kind : A random act of kindness can mean a lot for the person that receives it, and there are so many things you can do on a daily basis to show compassion to the people you love – and also strangers. You can call a friend that you haven’t spoken to in a long time; you can make some cake and give it to your neighbors – and you can volunteer at a homeless centre. 

4. They Express Gratitude : We often think about what we do not have, instead of being thankful for the things we have and for the love we receive from the people who surround us. Gratitude has the power to reframe the difficult times and show us that we are lucky despite the challenges we face. It is a great habit to remember what you have before going to sleep, from simple things like a warm bed to the people who love you.

5. They Keep Smiling : A simple smile can change the day of the person you meet. When you walk around, remember that everyone is fighting a battle, big or small – you cannot help everybody, but you can smile to show compassion and support. if you start the day smiling, the world will laugh back – positive energy attracts positive energy.

What do you thunk makes you a happy person. I look forward to seeing your comments. Take Care.  

 

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45 replies »

    • Oh yes, it’s very important to have an attitude of gratitude. In positive psychology research, gratitude is strongly and consistently associated with greater happiness. Gratitude helps people feel more positive emotions, relish good experiences, improve their health, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships. People feel and express gratitude in multiple ways.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you. Glad you liked the pair. I couldn’t agree with you more. Positivity doesn’t always refer to simply smiling and looking cheerful, however—positivity is more about one’s overall perspective on life and their tendency to focus on all that is good in life.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I consider myself to be a happy person, and I’ve been told so by others. The one thing I can’t express most is self-care. It’s taken me this long to recognize that taking care of myself is not selfish, it’s the best way to relax, rest, and recharge.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Self care should be on your priority list :). I understand where you are coming from because I struggle with self care too. Know your worth: Self-care is important to maintain a healthy relationship with yourself as it produces positive feelings and boosts your confidence and self-esteem. Also, self-care is necessary to remind yourself and others that you and your needs are important too.

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  2. Even with your first line alone resonated with me.
    “At some points in life, it’s not possible — or at least not easy — to feel happy”—- yes this is very true. There are times when we feel truly dark and happiness seem to evade us.

    I agree with your list. Despite the fact that all of those were very realistic and attainable, there are times when they are impossible to do. Butttt that is life and we have to tunnel through.
    Great post. Very uplifting 😊

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you Eva. I am glad you liked my post. Life is a precious gift. So why waste it when we have the choice to have a more meaningful existence? Yes, you have a lot of responsibilities— fixing the dryer, mowing the lawn, paying bills. But it’s important to remember that taking care of yourself is also your responsibility. Little things like sipping tea while looking at the raindrops racing down the window glass, enjoying a bubble bath, or reading a book are essential for your daily happiness. While things like taking up a new hobby or learning a new language can make your life more purposeful by giving you a new reason to get up in the morning.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Great advice on what to do to be happy!

    Our. Brain has all the answers?

    Maybe!

    But even more important are the questions!

    The two most important being

    Why?
    Why Not?

    And when to ask them!

    Words from other wise sages!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. “I learned to look more upon the bright side of my condition, and less upon the dark side, and to consider what I enjoyed, rather than what I wanted: and this gave me sometimes such secret comforts, that I cannot express them; and to which I take notice of here, to put those discontented people in mind of it, who cannot comfortably enjoy what God has given them, because they see and covet something He has not given them. All our discontents about what we want appeared to me to spring from the want of thankfulness for what we have.”

    – Daniel DeFoe, Robinson Crusoe

    “How much greater would you know the tiny seed, the quaking grass, if it were all the world? Consider the sparrow, and how much greater is his knowledge than your own. Only then will you go forth with a true appreciation for this world, this life. All of these fragile beings.”

    -Pazlo

    Liked by 2 people

    • It takes discipline to direct your thoughts to love, to increase your good habits, and to look after your body and soul every day. One way to increase your discipline is to write down the “why’s.” Ask yourself, why it is important to improve the quality of your thoughts? How would you feel having more loving thoughts? How would you feel if most of your thoughts were self-hating? Can this be a compelling reason? How would your life change if you treated your mind as sacred? How would life be if you treated it with respect? I used to have very low self-discipline, but step by step I kept improving it because I found compelling reasons to do so. Find your “why’s” and start with the first step. Today.

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  5. You liked my last blog, so I read one of the three listed for you. This was really good. I can affirm every point you made. One of the things I do after going to bed each night is express gratitude for the day and add specifics as I think of them. And, although, at 70 there is nothing handsome about me, I enjoy smiling at my face in the bathroom mirror! It makes me happy to see my smile. As Bobby McFerrin infectiously sang, “Don’t worry; be happy!”

    Liked by 2 people

  6. This obviously falls into the web of “to each their own”, so let me mention what makes ME happy. [P.S. What gets me high may not do the same for you.]

    I equate working towards a purposeful goal to be equal to attaining happiness. Humans were meant to set goals, achieve them, and make a difference in the lives of people around them.

    In fact, working on your goals is one of the best ways to improve the release of feel-good hormones in your brain (dopamine, serotonin, etc).

    Everytime I see a productive, laser focussed person, I see a happy face hiding underneath the mask of work. I see a peaceful person underneath the chaotic, yet ordered life they are willing to put up with to achieve their goals.

    Anyway, keep writing 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, yes you are right. Everyone has their own set of things which make them happy. My daily practice which I forgot to add here is Do nothing for 2 minutes. Guess what happens? Nothing! You didn’t lose your job. Your family didn’t leave you. You’re not a failure. Nobody judged you. In fact, the only thing that really happened was that you realized that you can make time for yourself and enjoy your own presence without consuming something (eating, watching TV, etc).

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      • This will move a little far afield from empress2inspire’s original inspirational post, but as a recovering workaholic, I really can’t let TheSpectacledCrusader’s comment pass unanswered.

        I am sorry to inform you that some of those laser-focused faces you see are not masking happiness at all – they’re masking deep pain. I will also hope that you did not intend the equation in the first sentence of your second paragraph to be taken quite literally, i.e. as meaning that you imagine work alone can ever be sufficient for happiness.

        Accomplishments – especially ones which benefit others – can be an important contributor to self-worth and therefore also contribute significantly to happiness and fulfillment in life. If you truly enjoy the work itself or if you enjoy most of it and don’t mind the rest – and if past experience tells you that the result will usually be meaningful – then work is a wonderful way to spend some of your energy. But don’t spend all of it that way, because a life consisting only of work – even if it’s meaningful work – is a very unbalanced and lonely life which will ultimately leave you quite sad. And unfortunately, obsessively focusing on work or on accomplishment of any kind is itself a very effective and in the long run very destructive strategy for avoiding this realization.

        If on the other hand you are pouring your energy into work in order to avoid giving it to something you don’t want to feel or to think about – or if you are doing the work in the expectation that accomplishing your goal will make you feel successful and that feeling successful will magically make you happy in any permanent sense – then in reality you are doing your emotional self great harm. I have personally plumbed the depths of crazy workaholism, because it was excruciating for me to feel what was in my heart, and my subconscious chose that method to bury it. I have also known someone who is truly brilliant but suffers from severe self-esteem issues; he would set goal after goal in life, achieving each of those goals and then immediately feeling dissatisfied – either classifying the experience as a failure despite the accomplishment because it was not done 100% perfectly, or else classifying the success as meaningless and unworthy of notice or pride.

        In both cases, we were “working towards a purposeful goal” – but in both cases, doing that was not at all what we needed to focus on. Not working at all or working purposelessly would not have been any better, but by focusing so obsessively on our work, we made our lives terribly unbalanced – and we were doing that because we subconsciously did not want to deal with some other very painful part of our lives. The extra energy which we poured desperately into our work was the energy which we should have been using to face that pain and try to resolve it – because until we had done that, we could never address the most important parts of our lives with whole hearts and unclouded minds.

        So if you find that you’re pouring most of your energy into work – whether it’s a paying job or a personal goal or goals – I would challenge you to ask yourself 3 questions:
        1) Do you enjoy the work itself and find the act of doing it fulfilling even before the work is completed?
        2) Looking back on having accomplished similar goals in the past, would you still say that you feel satisfied to have achieved them and that you regard the achievement as worthwhile and something in which you still take pride?
        3) What were you doing – and feeling – before you started pouring all of this energy into work, and why did you stop doing it?

        In my workaholic days, I would have answered question #1 with a resounding “yes” (in fact I still would, if not with the same knee-jerk enthusiasm), and question #2 would also have gotten a “yes”, if a more muted one. It’s question #3 which is the rub; that question can be very uncomfortable if you are pouring so much energy into work for the wrong reasons. If you find yourself trying to avoid it or trying to answer it quickly and move on to other thoughts, go back and look at it much more carefully. It’s quite likely that you’re doing all that work in order to avoid whatever is making you try to run away from that question – and I can promise you that if you do run away from the question now, in the long run you will bitterly regret it. Find someone you can trust – maybe a close friend, maybe a professional therapist – and explore that question very deeply to find where the pain is coming from, whether it is a wound or regret or is instead a place where you feel a void that you perhaps thought you could fill with accomplishments but are finding is still very much empty. Face that wound or that regret or that void, understand it, and begin to figure out what your heart truly wants in order to be at peace with that issue; when you can do that, you will be able to choose much more wisely in building the rest of your life.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Indeed Sir. Excitement. Make your life exciting. Envision a life that gives you butterflies. Take a class that sparks a creative fire inside you, plan a trip to a place you’ve always wanted to explore, go eat at a restaurant that you’ve always wanted to try. Your life is an adventure, so treat it as such. Allow yourself to dwell in the possibility—joy will soon follow.

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