Improve Your Sleep

Make new habits for sleeping rather than simply breaking old ones. You may want to start by keeping a sleep diary to help you understand your sleep patterns and habits.

Follow these simple sleep guidelines to help you sleep better.

  • Unplug – The light emitted from computer and TV screens disrupts your circadian rhythm and keeps you awake. Disruptions to your circadian rhythm are linked to vision problems, cancer and depression.
  • Don’t Eat or Drink at Night – Caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine can also cause sleep disruptions.
  • Never Do Any Work in Bed – If you associate your bed with reading emails and dwelling on work-related issues., it will be harder to relax there.
  • Meditate – Just five minutes of breathing meditation will lower stress, relax your body, and quite your mind.
  • Read a Real Book for Enjoyment – Make sure it’s not work-related. This should relax you and spur your creativity and passion.
  • Create a Hygiene Ritual – Repetition will send a psychological signal that you are getting ready for bed. Brush your teeth, wash your face, floss.
  • Make A To-Do List – Writing down tomorrow’s priorities will clear your mind for the night.
  • Pick a Bedtime – Decide when you have to wake up, and go to bed eight hours before then. Consider setting nightly alarm to remind yourself when to get ready for bed.
  • Keep a Journal – Spending just a few minutes to reflect on the positive highlights of your day can transform your attitude and keep you motivated.

The way you feel during your waking hours depends on how well you sleep at night. If you experience occasional or chronic sleep problems, it is important to learn ways to avoid the common enemies of good sleep. You can experiment with these sleep-promoting techniques and find the combination that works best for you. Having 7-8 hours of sound sleep may not be possible every night, but it is attainable most of the time. Sleeping healthily will mean that you will be mentally sharper and more productive, feel emotionally balanced, and have more energy each day.

65 Comments Add yours

  1. Interesting read! I got some new ideas for changing my sleep pattern. Thanks for sharing. Keep Writing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you. I am glad you liked it. In order to wake up feeling refreshed it’s important to focus on both sleep quantity—how much sleep you get each night—as well as sleep quality, which indicates how well you sleep. Poor sleep quality can cause you to feel groggy the next day and may even be linked to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. But determining the quality of your sleep is less straightforward than counting the number of hours you get. Thank you for stopping by.

      Like

  2. Informative reading Garima. Sleep patterns do have an impact on human body and I have realized it lately. Asymmetrical sleep habits do take a toll on health, and the next day activities too. I do follow few of the tips here, sleep journal is something i need to adopt.

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      That’s a great idea indeed Manohar. The Sleep Diary is a simple but effective way of getting insight into a person’s sleep patterns and habits. All it is is a record of when the person went to bed and when he or she woke up. More data can be included, but there is no fixed official format of what the diary must contain. Thank you for stopping by today.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes Indeed. However, with the smartwatches/fitness trackers offering to track daily activities of workout and sleep cycles. Planning to get one, to see how does it show the data of the sleep pattern.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Let me know how helpful they were 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Matt says:

    Couldn’t agree more on “downtime” from digital. I invariably read a paper book (not work related) at the end of the day, even if only one page, to help transition to a more relaxed mood. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Hi Matt, It’s important to initiate a digital curfew for the entire family, a time at which you and your kids turn off all electronic devices for the night. Try setting the curfew at two hours before bed, one hour before bed, or even 30 minutes before bed the earlier in the evening, the better, but whatever feels realistic. Thank you for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. ಅಂತರ್ಮುಖಿ says:

    Thank u garima.. I dont have much words to explain that how benificial ur artcl is..😊 love to read yur writings… N thanks fr making us alert about our health 👍

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      You are most welcome. I am glad you like my writing. Thank you for stopping by today.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Excellent tips! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Glad you liked it. Each of us operates on a biological schedule that plays a big role in when we feel tired and when we feel awake. When our internal sleep clocks are functioning normally, they send our bodies signals to sleep in the evening and wake in the morning. However, sometimes this sleep clock can fall out of sync, whether due to travel, work, stress, keeping odd hours, hormones or other factors. These steps can help you. Thank you for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, I’m currently adjusting to working odd hours (some normal daytime hours mixed with late night/weekend work schedule). Initially, this was very challenging. I’ll try to put some of your tips to good practice.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Let me know which won worked for you best. Looking forward to hearing from you.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. edas07 says:

    Thanks SO much for posting this!! The things you said to do were great- even though I write on my computer in my bed, it was such good advice!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Hahahha now worries. At least you are aware that technology shouldn’t be used before sleep. Your ability to function and feel well while you’re awake depends on whether you’re getting enough total sleep and enough of each type of sleep. It also depends on whether you’re sleeping at a time when your body is prepared and ready to sleep. You have an internal “body clock” that controls when you’re awake and when your body is ready for sleep. This clock typically follows a 24-hour repeating rhythm (called the circadian rhythm). The rhythm affects every cell, tissue, and organ in your body and how they work. Thank you for stopping by.

      Like

      1. edas07 says:

        Wow. So, just out of curiosity, what IS a good amount of sleep

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Anything between 7-9 hours.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. edas07 says:

        Okay- thanks so much

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Garima says:

        Happy to help 🙂

        Like

  7. I never thought of setting an alarm at night to tell me it’s time to start preparing for bed. What a great idea! Thank you!
    And another couple of important points for good refreshing sleep is to unplug the modem, and to either have blackout curtains or wear a sleep mask.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Hi Alexandra, sleep rejuvenates us. Eye masks are one of the best tools that can be used to overcome sleep problems and obtain restful relaxing sleep. When you block out both noise and light, your chances of falling asleep are improved. People who sleep regularly during the day, such as nurses or other shift workers can benefit greatly by using them. Thank you for stopping by and reading my post.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. lily23456 says:

    Will definitely try to do some of these. Do you think you could possibly do a post on how to relax before going to sleep. Like say you use aq breath technique what it is. I have just always had trouble sleeping and some of it is my fault but like maybe what you do to switch your brain off?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Sure Lily. I could do a post on relaxation before sleep. Keep a watch on my upcoming posts 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      I am glad you liked the post. You can take steps to improve your sleep habits. First, make sure that you allow yourself enough time to sleep. With enough sleep each night, you may find that you’re happier and more productive during the day. Sleep often is the first thing that busy people squeeze out of their schedules. Making time to sleep will help you protect your health and well-being now and in the future. Thank you for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you for the reblog. Glad you liked it.

      Like

  9. Great tips. One thing I do is once I climb in bed and unless I’m completely exhausted, is open a book to read. The unique thing is, it is always a book that I’ve read literally dozens of times.

    I find the act of turning a page or two(not using an e-reader) creates this sense of comfort. Rarely do I get further than a page or two before the eyes start to shut.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Hi Glen, this is a wonderful habit you have. Cracking open a book before you go to bed could help combat insomnia, too: A 2009 study from researchers at University of Sussex showed that six minutes of reading reduces stress by 68% (more relaxing than either music or a cup of tea), thus clearing the mind and readying the body for sleep. Thank you for stopping by today and sharing your thoughts.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks so much for posting. Great ideas.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        You are welcome 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  10. I sleep so badly 😞 good pointers Garima! Thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Hi Priscilla, Disturbed sleep is more than an inconvenience that leaves you dragging the next day: it can affect your emotional and physical health. It negatively affects your memory, concentration and mood, and it boosts your risk for depression, obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure. Happily, there are easy, natural fixes that can improve your sleep. Let me know which one worked for you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Too bad already got type 2 !😬 I fight sleep I think and it’s not restful

        Like

      2. Garima says:

        Hmm The connection may be hard to imagine. But the primary reason that regularly skimping on shuteye can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes is because your hormone levels get thrown out of whack. Specifically, with ongoing sleep loss, less insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar) is released in the body after you eat. Meanwhile, your body secretes more stress hormones (such as cortisol), which helps you stay awake but makes it harder for insulin to do its job effectively. The net effect: Too much glucose stays in the bloodstream, which can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Garima says:

        What are you doing for your sleep?

        Like

      4. Nothing really, I just sleep when I’m mentally tired I think.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Garima says:

        Hmmm let me see if I can find something for you, if you would like.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Alright then. Give me sometime and I will get back.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you so much for taking the trouble , I’ll definitely try these🌻

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Most welcome. Let me know if they worked for you.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Thank you for visiting my blog, and for promoting natural healing on yours — a great service to all, and particularly when so many are stressed, have difficulty sleeping, and have adverse reactions to pharmaceuticals. Warm wishes to you on your journey of helping others to help themselves.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you. I am a big believer of the fact that As long as we work along the laws of nature our bodies will heal themselves naturally. However, there is one main element that interferes with our body’s ability to heal itself. Thank you for stopping by.

      Like

  12. Love and Life 💕💕💕 says:

    Wow

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Glad you liked it.

      Like

      1. Love and Life 💕💕💕 says:

        As always…Nice writing

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Thank you for stopping by today and appreciating the post.

        Like

      3. Love and Life 💕💕💕 says:

        You are welcome

        Liked by 1 person

  13. emefasage says:

    Reblogged this on Masetena911 and commented:
    something for us

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you for the reblog.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. emefasage says:

        you’re welcome

        Liked by 1 person

  14. iamvhardik says:

    I am glad I came across the post. A lot of my issues tie into the fact I try to do a lot of work on my bed. I will try to change this habit of mine to become more functional and get better sleep.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Glad you found this post helpful Hardik.

      Like

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