Insulin Resistance Diet

The best diabetes diet is the insulin resistance diet and it is NOT supported by the commercial food business.   By the way, this is not a diet but a way of life. 

To commit to this diet means that you are eating in a way that increases your insulin sensitivity and keeps your blood sugar low.   It could require a serious alteration in your lifestyle which could mean the difference between a great life and a seriously ill life. Here’s how it is followed :

  • Limit Carbohydrates – For good health, carbs from vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes and dairy products take priority over other carbohydrates sources, especially those that contain added fats, sugars or sodium.
  • Avoid Sweetened Beverages – These include soft drinks, fruit drinks, iced tea and energy, and vitamin water drinks containing sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup and fruit juice concentrates.
  • Eat More Fibre – Research shows that diet, containing more than 50 grams of fibre per day are reported to improve glycemic in people with diabetes.
  • Eat Healthy Fats – Individuals with insulin resistance are encouraged to select unsaturated fats in place of saturated and trans fatty acids.
  • Get Enough Protein – Lean proteins, such as organic chicken, wild fish, free range eggs, lentils, yogurt and almonds, help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Eat Dairy – When choosing dairy as part of an insulin resistance diet, go for organic products instead of conventional products made with cow’s milk, like sheep or goat milk.
  • Think About Your Portions – Eat smaller meals throughout the day, and never let yourself get too hungry, which only increases your chances of overeating during your next meal.

Do NOT try to economise on good quality food. Instead cut out the junk food, the soft drinks, the chips and store bought cookies. Use the savings to buy good quality whole food instead of processed foods. Eat good quality fats good for your nerves and brain function which means they will keep you healthy when you are under stress.  

10 Comments Add yours

  1. Thanks so much for the detail that you have put into this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      I am glad you found it useful. Do let me know if was helpful in brining your sugar levels down!!

      Like

      1. Garima says:

        ๐Ÿ™‚๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you. I am glad you found it useful.

      Like

  2. my pickles says:

    Insulin resistant or stimulant diet๐Ÿค”, need to stimulate its release. Or better to call “Diet for Insulin Resitant”
    Love your writing..
    How you manage to do it daily ๐Ÿ˜ณ

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Yes itโ€™s diet for insulin resistant. Thank you for the apt headline.

      Like

  3. It’s just so that you have to distinguish between type I and type II diabetes. While decreasing glucose levels and increasing insulin release using body’s natural resources is all what type II diabetic needs, it’s completely different with type I diabetics. There are moments when they need to inject higher doses of insulin and have insulin boosting food for a meal, and then there are moments when they eat pure glucose and do it swiftly to prevent severe hypoglycemia or to cure it.
    This advice would work for those, who are not insulin-dependent, meaning, do not have to take insulin injections. For these people it is important to significantly decrease glucose intake level, especially when it comes from aggressive synthetic sugar. Sugar comes in many types with different glycemic indexes which have different spiking and lasting properties.
    I know, there is lots of advice, but as somebody, who has done extensive research in diabetes, and, especially in type I diabetes, I would say that any diet, any therapy, any type of lifestyle must be individually adjusted.
    General advice is fine and you’ve done just that, but I think it’s important to mention, who it is for.
    Commercial food suppliers do not aim to cure one, that’s absolutely true.
    I think the best diet is balanced diet which is adjusted for diabetic patients or pre-diabetics. Fats are good for anybody in controlled amounts and any high-in-protein food decreases sugar, that’s true. I completely agree with the great properties of dairy products, unsweetened, however..

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      All points noted. Your feedback is much appreciated. Thank you.

      Like

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