Myths About Depression

Depression is a very painful and difficult human experience. Depression is actually quite common it affects about one in ten people at some time in their lives. For some people, it might happen only once and pass quite quickly without any outside help. For others, depression may be more of a problem it may last longer or come back multiple times – in these cases, it may require treatment. 

Here are a few common myths people have about depression which makes them miss out on getting help at the right time :

Myth 1: “Nothing bad has happened to me, there’s no reason why I should be depressed. It must be my fault”.
Reality: Sometimes it is very hard for people to understand why they have become depressed, and they end up thinking that the depression is in some way their fault. But in almost every case, an outsider like a therapist can help people to see their depression in a different way. They do not have to blame themselves for feeling like that.

Myth 2: “I don’t know why people say this is depression. I’ve always felt like this. It’s just me, and nothing can change it”.
Reality: This is common when people have been treated badly early on, and have felt unhappy all of their lives. In this case, it is very difficult to see that the way they feel can be classified as depressed, and therefore not just how they are. It can be even more difficult to believe that it can change – but it can.

Myth 3: “Depression is biological – like a switch going in your brain – and there is nothing you can do about it. Only pills can make the difference” Reality: Depression is, in some sense, biological, more so for some people than others. And medication does help many people. But even if it is biological, it is clear that you may be able to speed the depression on its way by trying to make changes in the way you think and behave.

Myth 4: “Other people can cope with their lives without getting depressed – much worse things happen to them. I’m just weak and pathetic – I should be able to cope”.
Reality: It can look as though everyone is getting on with life and coping better than you. But this is partly because you tend to only focus on people who cope and not notice those who don’t. It may also be because people go to great lengths to hide it when they feel that they can’t cope, you might never see other people when they are having trouble coping. It is important to remember that the feeling that you cannot cope is a symptom of depression, and is not a sign that you are weak and pathetic.

Myth 5: “I should just be able to pull my socks up and get on with things. I shouldn’t need help from anyone else. Anyway, talking about yourself is just selfish and self-indulgent, and doesn’t help”.
Reality: If it were this simple, no one would ever be depressed. In fact, vast amounts of public money are poured into treatments of depression because it is recognised that people cannot just snap out of it, and talking in a constructive way that has been shown to help a lot of people.

Myth 6: “Why should I take medication? It won’t help, it can’t change the things that are making me depressed”.
Reality: It is true that medication will not change the things in your life that are troublesome. But it can help to make you feel better and therefore to cope with your problems in a different way.

Reference : https://www.cpft.nhs.uk/Documents/Miscellaneous/Coping%20with%20depression.pdf

33 Comments Add yours

  1. starlight says:

    thank you for getting this information out there – i wish my ex boyfriend had read and understood this information! but really, it’s important for people to understand this✨🙌🏽

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Garima says:

      It is. Many people don’t even understand what are the signs and symptoms of depression. It is nice to see people are interested to know more.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent discussion! I appreciate your points as I deal with a loved one who deals with depression.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Garima says:

      Glad you liked it. Depression doesn’t always “present” as it should. Prolonged sadness, lack of hope, or loss of interest in previously enjoyed activities are the most commonly mentioned symptoms on mental health websites and in antidepressant ads, and they can certainly be the most affecting. But sometimes the disorder is subtler, and harder to identify, since it can make itself known in stranger ways than we’d like.

      Like

  3. GREAT, GREAT, GREAT, GREAT!!! I had a conversation about the cultural perceptions of depression in China. Its incredibly sad that these points that you’ve highlighted can’t somehow we shared to those not in the know about the intricacies .

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Garima says:

      Depression doesn’t always “present” as it should. Prolonged sadness, lack of hope, or loss of interest in previously enjoyed activities are the most commonly mentioned symptoms on mental health websites and in antidepressant ads, and they can certainly be the most affecting. But sometimes the disorder is subtler, and harder to identify, since it can make itself known in stranger ways than we’d like. I hope people get more aware of it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Generally, society is becoming more over time. It’s slow, but its a working progress.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Let’s say it is a good start.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. N.S. Palmer says:

    There is so much nonsense written about depression and other emotional problems that it’s a refreshing change to see such a thoughtful and accurate analysis. Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you. I am glad you liked the article. Many people with depression don’t even know they have it. Depressive symptoms may range from mild to severe and they can vary greatly; symptoms are often attributed to fatigue, stress, or the aging process. It’s very subtle and hence we should speak about it more often.

      Like

  5. Very relevant, Thanks.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Garima says:

      Yes, its a less spoked about topic. Depression is a mental health condition which can affect thinking, energy, feelings and behaviour. It can vary from mild to severe and can have a profound impact, affecting every aspect of the individual, their relationships, family and work life.

      Like

      1. Yess it is! I suffer from this with other disorders so do understand the Stigma. Other people treat it as a Taboo.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Hang in there Champion.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Garima says:

        👍🏼👍🏼

        Liked by 1 person

  6. annyz4f says:

    I enjoy reading your posts, but I think this post was something that I think should be written about and alot of people are unaware or ignorant of depression and what its like. Thank you for this.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      How we see the world shapes who we choose to be — and sharing compelling experiences can frame the way we treat each other, for the better. This is a powerful perspective. It can be difficult to spot the signs of someone with high-functioning depression. That’s because, on the outside, they often appear completely fine. They go to work, accomplish their tasks, and keep up relationships. And as they’re going through the motions to maintain their day-to-day life, inside they’re screaming.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Lesley says:

    This is helpful and makes a lot of sense. Thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Garima says:

      Despite being one of the most common mental disorders, depression is often misunderstood. These myths and misconceptions may contribute to the stigma attached to depression, discouraging those affected to talk about their symptoms or seek help and treatment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Lesley says:

        You’re right, there’s a huge stigma attached to a multitude of mental health conditions and, I agree, this is why people tend to keep quiet. I’ve been called mad for being Vegan (lol) – what will people call me if I tell them I’m bi-polar!

        Liked by 1 person

  8. kinge says:

    This is very well written and explained. I would like to reblog it.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Hello Garima, first of all I would like to congratulate you and says thanks for writing about depression and creating awareness through this post.I have managed ,monitored and supervise many patients of mental disorders when I was medical officer at one of the dispensary under the guidance of psychiatrist.Depression whose among them.It takes lots of patience of months
    Or sometimes years and multiple counseling to bring patient out of depression.I personally recommend the patient to go for any meditation course(Art of living or shivkrupananda swami meditation course),also deep breathing exercises (Pranayam) would be of great help.I have personally observed and advised the patient to go for reading of spiritual book according to their belief system because that will enhance their will power.Also cultivation of any hobbies , learning new things,raising self esteem (volunteering blood donation camp or any philanthropic services) would be highly beneficial and great help to patients.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you Prakash you these pearls of wisdom from your experiences with depression clients. This is much helpful. Self help spiritual books actually work wonders on mental health.

      Like

  10. طيف says:

    that was amazing article

    Like

  11. Very good write-up. I certainly appreciate this site. Thanks!

    Like

  12. We absolutely love your blog and find a lot of your post’s to be precisely what I’m looking for. Would you offer guest writers to write content to suit your needs? I wouldn’t mind composing a post or elaborating on a few of the subjects you write about here. Again, awesome blog!

    Like

  13. SusshmithaR says:

    Wow! This is such a great blog!!! Much needed!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you Sushmita. The more aware are about mental health, the more we can save lives.

      Liked by 1 person

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