Stroke – Prevention Techniques

Upto 80% of strokes can be prevented. Although stroke can happen to anyone, certain risk factors can increase chances of a stroke. The following stroke prevention guidelines will help you learn how you may be able to lower your risk for a first stroke.

  • Know Your Blood Pressure – High blood pressure is a major stroke risk factors if left untreated. Have blood pressure checked yearly by a doctor or with an automatic blood pressure machine.
  • Identify Atrial Fibrillation – AF is an irregular heart rhythm that can increase stroke risk by 500%. AF can cause blood to pool in the heart, which may form a clot and cause a stroke. Get tested through your doctor or through a trusted health source so you can share results with your doctor.
  • Stop Smoking – Smoking doubles the risk of stroke. It damages blood vessel walls, speed up artery clogging, raises blood pressure and makes the heart work harder.
  • Limit Alcohol Use – Alcohol use has been linked to stroke in many studies. Most doctors recommend not drinking or drinking only in moderation – no more than two drinks each day.
  • Control Diabetes – Many people with diabetes have health problems that are also stroke risk factors. A doctor and dietician can help manage diabetes.
  • Manage Diet/Exercise – Excess weight strains the circulatory system. Exercise five times a week. Maintain a diet low in calories, salt, saturated and trans fats and cholesterol. Eat five servings of fruits and vegetables daily.
  • Treat Circulation Problems – Fatty deposits can block arteries carrying blood to the brain and lead to a stroke. Other problems such as sickle cell disease or severe anemia should be treated.
  • Lipid Profile Test – Cholesterol is a fatty substance in blood that is made by the body or found in certain foods. High cholesterol levels can clog arteries and cause a stroke. Get screened so you and your doctor know your cholesterol level.
  • Get Carotid Artery Ultrasound Screening – Carotid artery disease, or carotid artery stenosis, is the narrowing of the carotid arteries, the two main blood vessels in the neck. This narrowing is usually caused by a buildup of fatty plaque and can restrict flow to the brain and lead to stroke. Getting an ultrasound screening will let you and your doctor know if you have proper blood flow through these arteries.

Sometimes, having a stroke is unavoidable. Your age and family history are factors out of your control. But there are plenty of factors mentioned above that you can control, whether you’ve already had a first stroke, or are taking steps to prevent it.

18 Comments Add yours

  1. V.J. Knutson says:

    My husband recently had a temporary, and partial, loss of vision in one eye lasting only 5 minutes. His doctor suggested he go to emergency. Turns out this is a sign of blocked carotid artery. He subsequently had surgery to clear the blockage (more than 70%) and is feeling great. Thank goodness we didn’t ignore the symptom.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Yes it is very important to not ignore the symptoms at all. I am glad he is better now and he got the treatment at the right time.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. V.J. Knutson says:

        As are we! Thank you for your post.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Arun Arpan says:

    Thanks for this article 😊
    Preventive health monitoring is perhaps the best cure

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Yes indeed. The risk factors for stroke are similar to those for coronary heart disease and other vascular diseases. Effective prevention strategies include targeting the key modifiable factors: hypertension, elevated lipids and diabetes. Risks due to lifestyle factors can also be addressed: smoking, low physical activity levels, unhealthy diet and abdominal obesity. Combinations of such prevention strategies have proved effective in reducing stroke mortality even in some low-income settings.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Arun Arpan says:

        That’s very correct
        Lives these days are very prone to lifestyle diseases
        Ironically most of us use to ignore our own bodies for certain less important things
        Excessive pressure and tireless working time are too much responsible for it
        Physical and emotional imbalance us another risk factor

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        I agree with you Sir.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I know this is going to sound weird because I’ve been through many doctors from Colorado, North Dakota, Minnesota and now California and no one helps… I suffer from a few different things but the strangest one is this extreme pain that will run through my legs and can travel up into my head. Sometimes it’s in a focused area and other times it spreads sporadically all over. It comes on in my opinion with extreme weather Hot or cold or high stress on my mind or body. Also I will feel bruised without a bruise there. My ankle or shoulder, maybe some place on my arm… it will be so tender to touch I could cry. I had CT scans, MRIs and so many blood test it’s blow your mind the stack of medical bill I have wait for me. Every doctor blames depression and pumps me full of more anxiety and depression meds and every time the pain get worse. And my test say I’m normal and I get another bill to pay and new antidepressants. Do you have any idea what this might be?

    Like

    1. Garima says:

      See if the CT and MRI are not giving you results then it might be anxiety. I haven’t examined you or taken your history. My suggestions are based upon what you have written here. But yes I would want you not to pop up anti anxiety pills. You should definitely try alternative medicine like yoga, Ayurveda and or even energy medicine. Sometimes the energies in our outer aura affect us a lot. I could help you get a headstart on energy medicine. It is actually something that you can do at home yourself free of cost and with no side effects and clean your aura.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’d like that! Right now I take Topamax along with an anxiety medication and and antidepressants… It’s too much. Thank you 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        I am glad you found my suggestions helpful. Let me know if you need further help.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. gpavants says:

    Dear Garima,

    That’s good to know you can prevent this with simple changes. How do strokes in India compare to America?

    Gary

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Hi Gary, Currently, the stroke incidence in India is much higher than Western industrialized countries. Large vessel intracranial atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of ischemic stroke in India. The common risk factors, that is, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and dyslipidemia are quite prevalent and inadequately controlled; mainly because of poor public awareness and inadequate infrastructure.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. gpavants says:

        It’s in every culture in some form or another. We all can learn to be better managers of the things that come into our lives.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Yes indeed Gary. Changing times need different lifestyle.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. gpavants says:

        I am always learning to let go of more things that clutter up life and manage a few things better. God reminds me that little things do affect larger ones.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Garima says:

        That’s beautiful Gary.

        Liked by 1 person

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