Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are serious eating behaviours, which can be fatal if left untreated. They include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating.

  • Anorexia nervosa is characterised as becoming too thin (see malnutrition) when persons do not eat enough because they think they are fat.
  • Bulimia nervosa involves periods of overeating followed by purging, sometimes through self-induced vomiting or using laxatives.
  • Binge eating is out-of-control eating, often to the point of being uncomfortable. It is similar to bulimia but without purging.

Compulsive overeating has been classified as a separate eating disorder by some and included with binge eating by others. It has been called an addiction to food. Persons with compulsive overeating use food to cope with their feelings, which leads to obesity. Like those who suffer from binge eating, compulsive overeaters are at risk of heart attack, high blood-pressure, high cholesterol, kidney disease and/or failure, arthritis and bone deterioration, and stroke.

Who gets eating disorders?

  • Women are more likely than men to have eating disorders.
  • They usually start in the teenage years and often occur along with depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse.

How are eating disorders managed?

  • A qualified health professional should assist with diagnosis and management.
  • Eating disorders can cause heart and kidney problems and even death. Getting help early is important.
  • Treatment involves monitoring, mental health therapy, nutritional counseling, and sometimes medicines.

Reference : https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/eatingdisorders.html, http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/eating-disorders/complete-index.shtml, http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org

13 Comments Add yours

  1. This is interesting because I read an article in the news this morning about how this lockdown is threatening the recovery of those who are battling against eating disorders mainly because of the lack of access to their support systems and difficulties with finding certain foods for their diets. I can imagine how difficult it is for them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      It is. Itโ€™s a difficult time for everyone with mental health and/or eating disorders.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It has been. I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety a few years ago. The one thing that has kept me going during this time has been my faith in God.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        A slew of research has tied being religious with better well-being and overall mental health. A number of studies have found that devout people have fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety, as well as a better ability to cope with stress.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. iremmcalik01 says:

    good article ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Glad you liked it. Itโ€™s important to identify them.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Belladonna says:

    when I’m down I don’t eat but when I’m happy I can’t stop eating!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Hahahhaha try to do some meditation exercises before and after eating. Helps.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Belladonna says:

        Okay ๐Ÿคช๐Ÿ˜

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Hehehhe ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿผ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿผ

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.