Keys to Managing Criticism

I’ve always envied people who can graciously accept constructive criticism. It seems I was not born with that trait, and throughout my career I’ve struggled with receiving feedback, even when it was entirely accurate. At the moment I hear the words of critique, my heartbeat quickens and my mind begins to race—first in search of an explanation for this assault on my person and then for a retort to rationalise whatever actions are in question. Truth be told, I am not alone in feeling like this.

This can be damaging both for our physical and mental health and hence here are some steps which will help you take criticism in a healthy way :

  • Listen to everyone, no matter how painful.
  • Acknowledge good points made by the other side.
  • Admit when you make mistakes and learn from them.
  • You can disagree without being disrespectful.
  • Depersonalise criticism by not identifying with it.
  • Remember not everyone knows what is best for you.
  • Anyone who has done anything great has critics.
  • Know the difference between your core values and when you just being stubborn.
  • Try your best to never resort to personal attacks on insults.
  • You can understand another person’s views without necessarily agreeing with them.
  • Consider some criticism necessary for growth.
  • Actively encourage others to give healthy critiques.
  • Taking criticism like a champ ultimately takes practice and experience.

Reference : http://www.theemotionmachine.com/how-to-take-criticism-like-a-champ/

28 Comments Add yours

  1. charity1958 says:

    I can identify with your post. I don’t do well with criticism, but over the years, I have become more influential in handling a critique and, by the way. It is a learning experience! I have come a long way since my early years. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Garima says:

      I am glad you were honest about your experiences 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Garima says:

        🙌🏼🙌🏼

        Like

  2. Thank you for sharing, a very well written post

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you. I am glad you liked it. naysayers are essential. Both personal and professional success depend on being able to take criticism in your stride. The ability to hear and truly listen to people’s opinions, even when they’re negative, improves relationships, academic performance, and negotiating abilities.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Your welcome.
        Yes!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        🙌🏼🙌🏼⚡️⚡️

        Liked by 1 person

  3. drolia says:

    Really liked this point- Know the difference between your core values and when you just being stubborn.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Yes, if you can learn to put aside your ego and use even harsh criticism to get better, you’ll have a powerful tool that can propel you forward personally and professionally.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Jordan says:

    I know what you mean! I think criticism is hard for me because deep down I want everyone to like me, and if I receive criticism (even constructive) it seems like it’s an attack on me personally. But your pieces of advice are great! I try and keep in mind that at least for constructive criticism, it is not about me personally but about some trait I have or some action I did. Often painful, but part of the learning process and leads us to be better in the end.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Garima says:

      I am glad. A pause is very productive for reflection and to create more connections. Even when you are sleeping, your brain continues to process the most recent experiences.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jordan says:

        Definitely, which is why dreams can be very helpful in working things out from the day and understanding in a way that we couldn’t otherwise.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Exactly. Refocus and re-examine often is my mantra for sticking to my goals. It’s easy to get distracted and overwhelmed with what’s happening around us.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. “Know the difference between your core values and when you just being stubborn.”…. That one is a key for me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Glad you like it.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you for the repost.

      Like

  6. Very good counsel 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Glad you liked it. It’s hard to take criticism sometimes, also depends on the tone in which the other person uses to convey, would you agree?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I definitely would agree and believe that tone and body language play a major role in rejection of any type of communication.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        Yup :):)

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Chapters of Kate says:

    I love this! As soon as I hear negativity in their tone I start to panic!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Me too. 😦

      Like

  8. I am learning to take criticism as well – just got my instructor evaluations from last semester. They were horrifying and my heart actually started racing when I read them at first! I think it’s a vicious cycle – people who cannot take criticism are too afraid to try anything, and then because they lack initiative, whenever they do try to do something they fail leading to harsh critiques. Nice post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Many people get defensive at the mere possibility of negative feedback. But no one’s perfect. It’s okay to think about your strengths and weaknesses. When you’re about to receive either type of feedback, approach the situation with an open mind, so you can understand the difference. For example, “Hey, are you able to eat in a different room or chew more quietly at your desk?” may seem confrontational at first. But it may just be someone trying to deal with their own distractions and self-improve. And, to be honest, you didn’t have to set up an actual microwave next to your sticky notes.

      Like

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