Gut Bacteria and Health

The human gut harbors diverse microbes that play a fundamental role in the well-being of their host. The constituents of the microbiota—bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotes—have been shown to interact with one another and with the host immune system in ways that influence the development of disease. 

Here are a few links between gut bacteria and health :

  • Mood Disorders – Bacteria in the gut activate neural pathways and central nervous system singling systems. Gut dysbiosis, especially a lack of beneficial bacterial strains, is linked to depression and anxiety, with more than a third of depression sufferers also having a leaky gut.
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – Dysfunction of the gut microbiome, perhaps related to high stress and/or antibiotic use, is linked to OCD.
  • Schizophrenia – Mice studies link a lack of normal bacteria with changes in brain development and schizophrenic behaviour. Human infants born prematurely are known to lack biodiversity in their guts and be at a higher risk of schizophrenia.
  • Autism – Autism often co-occurs with gastrointestinal issues like leaky gut and irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Multiple Sclerosis – Dysbiosis and the resulting loss of balance in gastrointestinal immune responses are lined to the development of MS and may explain why MS symptoms can be mitigated with therapeutic diets.
  • Cardiovascular Disease – Certain grain loving bacteria are known to also convert L-carnitine, a protein rich in red meat, into an atherogenic compound called TMAO, raining the risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • Asthma and Allergies – Low diversity of gut bacteria, especially early in life, is linked to increased risk of asthma and allergies.
  • Obesity – Gut microbes can impact metabolism via singling pathways in the gut, with effects on inflammation, insulin resistance, and deposition of energy in fat stores. A number of studies show specific microbial patterns associated with obesity.
  • Diabetes – Diabetics have lower levels of beneficial strains of bacteria and skewed ratios of different strains, with lower numbers of gut microbes overall. Some compositional changes in gut microbiota appear to scale with glucose levels that is the higher a person’s glucose levels, the fewer total microbes and the more undesirable species of bacteria are likely to be found in that person’s gut.
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease – Abnormally high levels of certain undesirable strains of bacteria along with dysregulated immune responses to gut microbes may trigger the development and continuing symptoms of both Crohn’s diseases and ulcerative colitis.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome – There is a definitive link between IBS and an overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine (SIBO).
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis – Studies have found link between low levels of probiotic bacteria and high levels of undesirable bacteria strains with autoimmune joint diseases like RA.
  • Colorectal Cancer – Lower levels of beneficial bacteria as well as higher levels of certain sugar loving microbes in the gut are linked to increases risk and growth rates of colorectal cancer.
  • Other Cancer – Dysbiosis is linked to increased risk of gastric, oesophageal, pancreatic, laryngeal, breast, and gallbladder carcinoma.

Reference : https://www.nosterprobiotics.com/the-link-between-gut-bacteria-and-health/

16 Comments Add yours

  1. M'bolla says:

    Thanks for the exposition. xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Most welcome. Did you find it useful though?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. M'bolla says:

        Very useful. Gracias

        Liked by 2 people

      2. GS says:

        Glad to know that 🙂

        Like

  2. Rambler says:

    Have you written more on IBS?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Briefly Yes. Here’s something you may find useful : https://empress2inspire.blog/2020/02/21/dos-and-dont-of-ibs/
      Let me know if you have more questions. Would love to share.

      Like

  3. B Sudharsan says:

    This post is so cool! I never knew even OCD could have something to do with the human gut. Never had a gut feeling about it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder have a gut bacterial microbiome marked by diminished species diversity and abundance, compared with that of healthy controls, according to the first study to examine the issue.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Omatra7 says:

    Very informative… in prevention of these issues … do those probiotic yogurts and drinks help?

    I don’t have these issues, but I always hear about those probiotic products – so I am curious.

    And on another note… do you take requests? If you do… you are the one I think of, who would know how to answer properly. ✌️

    What is the difference with the Keto diet and Atkins? Which is better and are those safe?

    I have read a little on it – but I am not familiar with diets and really don’t understand them because there are soooooo many for everything!!! I really don’t understand the difference between those 2 diets

    I definitely do believe – what you eat and put in your body effects it!! Both mind and body.

    Thank you always ❤️✌️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Hi Omatra, thank you for considering me to answer your question. Atkins and keto are both low-carb diets that may benefit weight loss, diabetes management, and heart health. Their main difference is that you gradually increase your carb intake on Atkins, while it remains very low on the keto diet, allowing your body to stay in ketosis and burn ketones for energy.
      Also I am all out for Probiotics. Our body normally has what we would call good or helpful bacteria and bad or harmful bacteria. Maintaining the correct balance between these bacteria is necessary for optimal health. Age, genetics, and diet may influence the composition of the bacteria in the body (microbiota). An imbalance is called dysbiosis, and this has possible links to diseases of the intestinal tract, including ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, and Crohn’s disease, as well as more systemic diseases such as obesity and type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Hence you need probiotics.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Omatra7 says:

        Thank you! ❤️ I knew you were the person to ask!!

        I really appreciate that – thank you very much ❤️✌️

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        I am just glad you found the information useful. Take Care.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Omatra7 says:

        You too! 😊✌️

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Thoughtful and informative! Our gut health affects much of our bodies, definitely more than I thought.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Ah yes, I am beginning to unleash the depth of knowledge on how gut affects our body as a whole.

      Like

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