Ways to Manage Stress

Coping with stress is a dynamic process including the nature and extent of the stimulus itself, personal characteristics like gender or personality and external resources like one’s socioeconomic status or social support levels. It is important to acknowledge that people differ in their ways of dealing with problems. Once a certain stimulus is being perceived as stressful for example an upcoming deadline a wide range of different response options are set in motion. This reaction is typically referred to as the ‘coping process’.

Here are some more ways in which you can manage stress :

  • Make a game plan – Not only will having a to-do list reduce stress, it will help you stay more focused.
  • Take deep breaths – Taking a second to step away may help your body handle stress better, The idea is to get your breath slower to activate the body’s relaxation mode.
  • Scale it down – Set realistic expectations. Studies often point of lofty expectations as a reason for higher stress levels.
  • Know the signs of stress – Irritability, fatigue, and headaches are all physical signs of stress.
  • Make a budget – Money is considered the most stressful factor for many, so keeping a budget can keep you from going overboard.
  • Eat & drink wisely – Eating balanced amounts of whole grains, lean meats, fresh fruits and veggies can help you manage your stress levels.
  • Remember to laugh – A study on college stress levels found the laughter, yoga, and reading significantly reduced stress.
  • Chat with a friend – Ina recent study, 43% of people who said they had no one to turn to for emotional support also reported their stress had increased in the past year.
  • Listen to the right music – Many studies have found that listening to soothing sounds like nature soundtracks or classical music can lower stress-related blood pressure.
  • Get some exercise into your day – Cardiovascular exercise releases feel good hormones in our brain called endorphins, which can help us feel happier and less stressed.
  • Get enough sleep – A small 2012 study revealed that sleep deprived subjects exhibited lower tolerance for stress.
  • Take a nap – One study found that participants who napped after a sleepless night had decreased levels of the stress related hormone, cortisol.
  • Take a break from what’s stressing you out – You know what stresses you out, so make sure you’re only exposing yourself to that situation in moderation.
  • Confront what’s stressing you – If you ignore daily stressors, they can build up into something far more serious called chronic stress, which can contribute to anxiety and depression.
  • Talk to the doctor – Chronic stress is becoming a public health hazard. Talk to a professional. Seek help.

Reference : https://www.businessinsider.in/15-ways-to-manage-stress-according-to-scientists/articleshow/50699688.cms

18 Comments Add yours

  1. During my many years spent in public education, I valued the idea of having a game plan. What successful teacher or coach doesn’t possess a plan for success. I often mentored less experienced teachers to not try to take on too many new instructional ideas at once. Manage and master a few at a time.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Garima says:

      Ah that’s a great approach and tip. Thank you for sharing. One step at a time indeed.

      Like

  2. clcouch123 says:

    This is a good, promising, and practical list. I especially appreciate your including humor as a part of the plan.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      A good laugh has great short-term effects. When you start to laugh, it doesn’t just lighten your load mentally, it actually induces physical changes in your body.

      Like

  3. kellyanngegg says:

    These are all such great and useful tips! I try to do too much myself and I know I get too stressed! Definitely working on incorporating some of these!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      A stress journal can help you identify the regular stressors in your life and the way you deal with them. Each time you feel stressed, keep track of it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. kellyanngegg says:

        That’s a great idea! I have plenty of blank journals lying around – it’d be a good way to keep track!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Garima says:

        👍🏼👍🏼Glad you liked the idea.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Thank you for sharing

      Like

  4. gpavants says:

    Garima,

    Myself and a few more family members can use these tips. Thank you. What’s a neat side note: one key to people living to be 100 or more learned how to manage stress and use it wisely. We do need a certain amount if good stress or we would be lumps on the couch.

    Thank you,

    Gary

    On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 11:32 AM Be Inspired..!! wrote:

    > Garima posted: ” Coping with stress is a dynamic process including the > nature and extent of the stimulus itself, personal characteristics like > gender or personality and external resources like one’s socioeconomic > status or social support levels. It is important to acknow” >

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Yes indeed Gary. How we perceive every challenge in our lives is very important to our mental health

      Like

  5. Priyanka says:

    Stress is the major reason basically for mental health disorder. We should focus on stress management its really very important in today’s life where people are lacking patience.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      I definitely suffer when I’m impatient because a lack of patience is a stress response to whatever is going on in my life. I can feel the stress in both my mind and my body. And so, cultivating patience is a way of taking care of myself, which is the essence of self-compassion.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. It’s a good thing I love to laugh. Humor is what keeps me sane.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Garima says:

      Humor is very important indeed.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Omatra7 says:

    Completely agree with everything said!! 👌

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garima says:

      Stress is a natural, normal part of life. It is important to note that the experience of stress varies greatly among the individual. What constitutes overwhelming stress for one person may not be perceived as stress by another.

      Liked by 1 person

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