Science Behind Being Drunk

For many of us, a Friday night drink comes after a hard week at work – your body is often pumped up with stress hormones such as adrenaline, which cause the blood vessels to dilate in order to get the blood to the muscles faster (this is the so-called fight or flight response, which helped us survive as a species).

While I do not want to spoil the high for you, but let’s look at what happens in the body after you have had a few drinks :

  • You feel shaky and sleepy. Low blood glucose levels are responsible for that shaky feeling, heavy sweating, dizziness and blurred vision. Low glucose levels also result in feeling tired.
  • You crave fries or fatty food. To overcome the feeling of lethargy and tiredness, the body will be craving a carbohydrate boost, which is why many people feel hungry when they have been drinking.
  • Feel feel sick the next day. When the liver is metabolising alcohol, it produces acetaldehyde, a vinegar-like substance that has toxic effects on the liver, brain and stomach lining, resulting in severe headache, nausea, vomiting and heartburn and the feeling of being unwell. Alcohol also plunder our stores of vitamins and minerals, which need to be in the correct function normally. The toxicity of alcohol can irritate the stomach, causing stomach upset, often resulting in vomiting.
  • Your quality of sleep will drop. Though some people feel a nightcap helps them fall asleep, much scientific evidence suggests the quality of sleep will drop due to dehydration. People are still likely to feel tired after sleeping following drinking as they will have missed out on quality sleep.
  • The toxic effects of alcohol can also cause inflammation of the oesophagus, the tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach, causing heartburn.
  • It disturbs that appropriate balance of minerals in the blood including potassium along with calcium, and sodium which are known as ions, is maintained by the kidneys. The level of each in must be maintained within narrow limits but dehydration caused by drinking, can affect the concentration of ions by draining potassium from the body, resulting in thirst, muscle cramps, dizziness and faintness.
  • The liver needs water to get rid of the toxins from the body but as alcohol acts a diuretic there will not be sufficient amounts in the body, so the live rid forced to forced to divert water from other organs, including the brain which cases the throbbing headache.

Reference : https://visual.ly/community/Infographics/health/science-getting-drunk

14 Comments Add yours

  1. your's_Nomison says:

    Helpful..thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Glad you found it helpful.

      Like

      1. your's_Nomison says:

        🥂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Easy solution….don’t get drunk. I never saw the point of drinking beyond what your body could handle…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Hahahah I am agreement with you on drinking as much body can handle. Another way would be to keep ourselves hydrated.

      Like

  3. Well said, I wish I would of read this years ago….It will help someone…can I share this?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yes please.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Efrona Mor says:

    Great article!! Have a safe weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      The impression is that drinking is cool, but the nervous system changes that come from drinking alcohol can make people do stupid or embarrassing things, like throwing up or peeing on themselves. Glad you liked the post.

      Like

  5. I personally haven’t had any alcohol going on 6 months now and I sure don’t miss that morning after sick feeling. It didn’t take any effort at all I just lost interest. My daughter and son-in-law drink heavily so when I get the drunken phone call I will try to talk about the non-healthy part of drinking if either one of them asks. But as we all know it’s up to them to change.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you helping them Sheryl. If they are ready to stop drinking and willing to get the support, they can recover from it. In the early stages of change, denial is a huge obstacle.

      Like

  6. Rambler says:

    Its interesting to read about how alochol is a diuretic, my personal experience totally agrees with this. I think a lot of the after effects related to alochol is mainly because of it being diuretic.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Ah yes, Alcohol also reduces the production of a hormone called vasopressin, which tells your kidneys to reabsorb water rather than flush it out through the bladder.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.