Are You Sleep Deprived?

Sleep is good for you. So what happens when age-old culprits like insomnia or sleep apnea or newer ones like a jam-packed schedule cause you to lose sleep? That’s right, they may affect your health particularly your heart. Far from being a time-wasting, 8-hour sentence in a useless void, the research is pretty clear on this point: sleep is crucial for good health. It helps memory and mood, keeps you trim, strengthens your immune system, fights inflammation, and keeps your heart and blood vessels in tip-top shape.

Here are a few signs of sleep deprivation that you need to be aware of :

  • Long term mood disorders – Chronic sleep debt can lead to disorders like depression and anxiety.
  • Sickness – Prolonged lack of sleep can disrupt your immune system, making it harder to fend off bugs. And once you’re sick, lack of sleep can make it harder to recover.
  • Diabetes – Studies suggest people who sleep less than five hours a night have an increases risk of having or developing diabetes.
  • Infertility – Sleep disturbances can reduce the secretion of reproductive hormones, resulting in trouble conceiving.
  • Weight Gain – Studies how people who sleep less than seven hours a day are 30 percent more likely to be obese.
  • Low Libido – Men and women who don’t get quality sleep have a decreased interest in sex.
  • Heart Disease – Long term sleep deprivation is associated with an increases heart rate, blood pressure and higher levels of chemicals that are lined to inflammation.

So how many hours of sleep are you getting everyday?

Reference : https://www.themindlygroup.com/how-much-sleep-do-you-need/

21 Comments Add yours

  1. I’m totally sleep deprived. It’s a stress thing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Hmmm….I thinking some mindful activities should help you refocus your mind again. Also exercise releases a lot of serotonin in the body which improves sleep. Just a suggestion.

      Like

  2. What! I sometimes sleep for 4 hours and I feel like a corpse already 😱

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yea me too specially these days. But then it is important to get your circadian rhythm on point.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks for sharing this with us 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        Most welcome. Thank you for stopping by again.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Kritika says:

    I had a long conversation today on the same with my aunt. Thank you for sharing. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Most welcome. I hope you found this post informative.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Kritika says:

        Learned and added more to my knowledge. Thank you 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        Great. 🙂 Thank you for stopping by again and leaving a comment.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I get a whole lot more than I used to.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Hahahah we all are getting more sleep now. However, Too much sleep on a regular basis can increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and death according to several studies done over the years. Too much is defined as greater than nine hours. The most common cause is not getting enough sleep the night before, or cumulatively during the week

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think I’ve only had more than nine hours on 2-3 times in my entire life. I used to run off of 1-3 hours per day, but now I’m averaging about 5-6 on a good day.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        That is very good progress. Keep it up and keep inspiring.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. gpavants says:

    Garima,

    7-8 hours. Yes, so important. If you can hit more REM that’s important too, right?

    Thanks,

    Gary

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yes Gary. As you get your much needed, revitalizing rest at night, your body actually goes through various sleep cycles. Each phase of sleep is important and beneficial to your body and mind, but REM sleep is especially fascinating because it increases brain activity, promotes learning, and creates dreams.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. gpavants says:

        REM sounds like it has mental healing properties. I have been very interested in a study of the whole person health issue. With COVID, I have noticed many human layers being exposed. In other words what we saw was how unhealthy mentally, emotionally, socially, spiritually, and physically. ( and any other human “ually”). We saw that that there is need for health from the inside out. Dreams and those deeper inner battles might be the spirit’s way of housecleaning, renewing, and strengthening. What do you think about that?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        I agree Gary. Studies report that REM sleep enhances learning and memory, and contributes to emotional health — in complex ways.

        Liked by 1 person

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