Music Therapy

Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence based use of music interventions to accomplish individualised goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. Studies show that listening to music for 1 hour over a period of 7 days increased feelings of power, and decreased pain, depression and disability related to chronic back, neck and joint pain. The average person listens to 25 songs per day. The first music therapy degree program in the world was founded in Michigan State University.

Here’s what happens to your brain on music :

  • Listening to music causes the brain to please dopamine, a feel good chemical.
  • Music acts as a distractor, focusing the attention away from negative stimuli to something pleasant and encouraging.
  • Music has the ability to alter breathing and heart rate.
  • Music also has the power to improve your state of mind. This helps keep things like depression and anxiety at bay.
  • Music with a strong beat can stimulate brainwaves. Slow beats encourage the slow brainwaves that are associated with hypnotic or meditative states. Faster beats may encourage more alert and concentrated thinking.
  • Music occupies the mind with something familiar and soothing.
  • Music laters patterns of pain, depression and disability.
  • Music can help reduce perception of pain.

Music therapy can involve making music, listening to music, writing songs and talking about lyrics.

You can try music therapy at home in the following way :

  • Choose your music based on the purpose of your therapy. For example, choose soft instrumental music or ocean sounds to relax. For pain management, look for music that focuses your mind on things other than you pain and discomfort.
  • Set back and relax. Take deep breaths, close your eyes and let the sound of the music take over your thoughts.
  • Listen and concentrate. Enjoy the music for 10-15 minutes as you allow your mind and body to relax and rejuvenate.

Reference : https://www.behance.net/gallery/18428517/Music-Therapy-Infographic

20 Comments Add yours

  1. This is so true. I’m always listening to something because it does change my mood. I used to write my own music up until a few years ago. Just playing and watching everything come together literally used to make forget about everything else.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      I love Binaural beats. They are an auditory illusion caused by listening to two tones of slightly different frequency, one in each ear. The difference in frequencies creates the illusion of a third sound — a rhythmic beat. Neurons throughout the brain begin to send electrical messages at the same rate as the imaginary beat.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh wow! I will look into it.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        Let me know if you liked them.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I definitely will.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Ab says:

    Absolutely agree with this. Musical therapy has also worked wonders for special needs children.

    “Music makes the people come together!”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Research demonstrates that adding music therapy to treatment improves symptoms and social functioning among schizophrenics. Further, music therapy has demonstrated efficacy as an independent treatment for reducing depression, anxiety, and chronic pain.

      Like

  3. judeitakali says:

    Thanks alot for this Garima. I don’t know if you here this much but your blog is heaven-sent

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you very much Jude.

      Like

  4. gpavants says:

    Garima,

    It’s so true that music really does do something to the entire person. If more people really thought about the music they listen to maybe they would choose it more carefully.

    Thanks,

    Gary

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yes Gary. Participation in group music therapy such as singing or playing an instrument with others has been found to have positive impacts on social interactions, communication skills, well-being, hope, and optimism.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. gpavants says:

        Isn’t that cool that many people during the quarantine showed off their musical talent? People really seemed to respond to it.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        Yes it was like they found the time to be creative.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. gpavants says:

        Time to find one’s coping skills. In America we have become very relaxed and not challenged. This crisis has been an opportunity for people to break out of the rutt and maybe grow.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. GS says:

        Indeed Gary.

        Like

  5. Wonderful post 💐💐💐

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Music therapy can be used for facilitating movement and overall physical rehabilitation and motivating clients to cope with treatment. It can provide emotional support for clients and their families, and provide an outlet for expression of feelings. Glad you liked the post Prakash.

      Like

  6. Manoj Mehra says:

    There is nothing like music. Music has healing power.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yes it has. It’s almost impossible to find someone who doesn’t feel a strong connection to music. Even if you can’t carry a tune or play an instrument, you can probably reel off a list of songs that evoke happy memories and raise your spirits. Surgeons have long played their favorite music to relieve stress in the operating room, and extending music to patients has been linked to improved surgical outcomes. In the past few decades, music therapy has played an increasing role in all facets of healing.

      Like

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