Unhelpful Thinking Habits

Modern
psychotherapy
tells
us
that
when
stress
becomes
a
disorder
it
 causes
a
shift
in
thinking
–
and
we
filter
and
process
situations
and
events
though
a
distorted
 and
gloomy
lens.
The
’picture’
is
off
track,
and
it
is
not
the
situation
that
is
causing
our
upset,
 it
is
our
judgement
of
the
situation
(to
paraphrase
the
philosopher
Epictetus).


The
following
are
the
most
common
thinking
patterns
people
with
anxiety
and
depression
 develop.
Note:
all
of
us
do
some
of
these
some
of
the
time,
but
when
we
adopt
many
of
them
 as
our
natural
default
position,
we
have
a
problem.
Can
you
see
yourself
here?
If
you
can,
 don’t
worry,
that’s
a
good
thing!
It
means
you
have
the
ability
to
self
critique,
and
that
if
you put
the
work
in,
you
can
dismantle
those
habits
and
build
new
ones
using
rational
thinking
skills
with
CBT.


  • All or Nothing Thinking – Sometimes called “Black and White Thinking”. If I’m not perfect I have failed. Either I do it right or not at all.
  • Over Generalising – “Everything is always rubbish”, “Nothing good ever happens”. Seeing a pattern based upon a single event, or being overly broad in the conclusions we draw.
  • Mental Filter – Only paying attention to certain types of evidence. Noticing our failures but not seeing our successes.
  • Disqualifying the Positive – Discounting the good things that have happened or that you have done for some reason or another. That doesn’t count.
  • Jumping to Conclusions – There are two key types of jumping to conclusions. Mind reading is imagining we know what others are thinking. Fortune telling is predicting the future.
  • Magnification (catastrophising and minimisation) – Blowing things out of proportion (catastrophising), or inappropriately shrinking something to make it seems less important.
  • Emotional Reasoning – Assuming that because we feel a certain way what we think must be true. I feel embarrassed so I must be an idiot.
  • Using Critical Words – Using critical words like “should”, “must”, or “ought” can make us feel guilty, or like we have already failed. If we apply “shoulds” to other people the result is often frustration.
  • Labelling – Assigning labels to ourselves or other people. I’m a loser. I’m completely useless. They’re such an idiot.
  • Personalisation “this is my fault”, being yourself or taking responsibility for something that wasn’t completely your fault. Conversely, blaming other people for something that was your fault.

Reference : https://www.psychologytools.com/resource/unhelpful-thinking-styles/

3 Comments Add yours

  1. inspirechief says:

    A very insightful and informative article. I know lots of people who have these thinking patterns. I use to be one of them. Stay safe.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Once you can identify your unhelpful thinking styles, you can start to notice them – they very often occur just before and during distressing situations. Once you can notice them, then that can help you to challenge or distance yourself from those thoughts, and see the situation in a different and more helpful way. I am glad you liked the article.

      Liked by 1 person

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