Color Psychology

Color psychology is a field of study that’s devoted to analyzing the emotional and behavioral effects produced by colors and color combinations. Ecommerce website owners want to know which color will make their website visitors spend more money. Home decorators are after a color that will transform a bedroom into a tranquil Zen retreat. Fast-food restaurant owners are dying to know which color combinations will make you want to super-size your meal. As you can imagine, color psychology is big business.

Describing the emotional connections that people can have with colors can be a very hippy-esque topic and that is why it is handy to have an understanding of the emotional attributes of some of the main color groups.

  • Red – Anger, danger, warmth and passion. It can increase heart rate and raise blood pressure, and be overwhelming if used too much.
  • Orange – Bright, fun, friendly and playful. Commands attention without being overpowering.
  • Yellow – Positive, optimistic, and energetic. Good for points of sale messaging and calls to action.
  • Green – Growth, rebirth, nature, stability, endurance and abundance. Has a balancing or harmonising effect and if often used in relation to wealth.
  • Blue – Trustworthy, calm and peaceful. Often used in banking. Light blue can be relaxing, while dark blue can signify strength and reliability.
  • Purple – Nostalgic, sentimental and sophisticated. Symbolises wealth and luxury.
  • Pink – Dust pink can be sentimental, while a vibrant pink symbolises a youthful energy.
  • Brown – Honesty and simplicity. Often used for organic companies and can bring warmth and wholesomeness to designs.
  • White – Simplicity and purity. Considered neutral, it converts cleanliness and minimalism.
  • Black – Bold, powerful, classic, confidence and sophistication. Make designs feel edgier or elegant and is used for typography and other functional parts for neutrality.
  • Grey – Neutral, moody, conservative and formal. Often used when formality and professionalism are key.

Reference : https://convertkit.com/color-theory-for-bloggers

16 Comments Add yours

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for the reblog.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Efrona Mor says:

    I love the subject of color psychology, and I’ve been looking for a book that shows the consistency across the spectrum of cultures. If you know of one, I’d to hear from you! Nice article by the way!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I’m so glad that you have written about the positive emotion of colour connections. (So many people know only the negatives like green for envy etc).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Blue is the colour of the mind and is essentially soothing; it affects us mentally, rather than the physical reaction we have to red. Strong blues will stimulate clear thought and lighter, soft blues will calm the mind and aid concentration. Consequently it is serene and mentally calming. It is the colour of clear communication. Blue objects do not appear to be as close to us as red ones. Time and again in research, blue is the world’s favourite colour. However, it can be perceived as cold, unemotional and unfriendly.

      Like

  3. Seeing this post reminded me of Tale of the Cattail Forest- the first book I am working on (draft five as of now).

    Sparkle, my main character, has a gift in drawing. All the Fairy Frogs use their arts to control their emotions. Sparkle understands how colors affect emotion due to her talent, and eventually SPOILER: helps Sarge, the antagonist, deal with his anger and pain. Sarge had a tragic and abusive childhood resulting in him being a bully. So Sparkle teaches Sarge how to control emotion by colors. This leads to Sarge basically drawing some: his drawing had a lot of red, black, and blue. This actually helps him in the end.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Ah excellent. We have a writer is our midst. Glad to know you.

      Like

  4. clcouch123 says:

    This is a detailed list, and the associations go with what I’ve used in Communication classes. Like the commenter above, I’ve wondered about how the associations change with cultures. I mean, I’ve taught the ones I know, though I’m sure there are more.

    This is an important aspect of perceptive reality to raise. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Colors carry deep meanings with them in every culture. Western, Far Eastern, Middle Eastern, Indian, and African cultures have stark differences in the symbolism of colors within their cultures. For instance, in some cultures, white represents innocence, but in others, it can represent death.

      Like

  5. Lisa says:

    Wow. This is so interesting to me because I have never heard of color psychology

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Ah then you should study it. I am sure you will find it interesting. Color psychology addresses the way colors and emotions are intricately linked and how color affects human behavior. There has been little rigorous scientific study on the psychological effects of color, but plenty of anecdotal evidence exists.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for the reblog Manas.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for the reblog.

      Like

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