Tips for Healthy Negotiations

At any stage of your career—whether you are interviewing for a job or already a leader at your company—strong negotiation skills are a must. They also follow you from the workplace into other aspects of your life. Negotiating with classmates about who will tackle which parts of a group assignment. Negotiating a lower price with a salesperson. The Washington Post says to “consider everything as a negotiation opportunity.”

Consider the following tips for health negotiation :

Be Clear With Intent

  • What’s the problem you are trying to solve?
  • What outcome do you desire?
  • What emotions are driving this intent?
  • Is this something you want to something that you need?
  • Is it rational? How?
  • How much do you care about it?
  • Are there any inherent assumptions driving this intent? Have you validated them?

Prepare and Practice

  • Choice to act in the knowledge or react without it.
  • Write down the questions the other person might ask and prepare your responses.
  • Practice your tone, observe your body language.
  • What do you know about the person you are interacting with?
  • What other alternatives will be acceptable to you?
  • Do you have enough data to support your request?
  • What will you do if the other person is ruse or refuses to negotiate?

Frame It Right

  • Keep the discussion about the problem and not the person.
  • Communicate with respect.
  • Always use a positive tone. Use self control to take charge of your feelings.
  • Never say “Ok” when you don’t agree with their viewpoint. Reflect using “hmmmm” and silence.
  • Build up a narrative around your goals and mention it casually as part of the discussion.
  • Do not use words like “I think” or “I believe”.
  • Reflect confidence in your choice of words.

Seek to Understand

  • Show genuine curiosity to understand the other person.
  • Learn the constraints of the other side.
  • Inquire how they make decisions by learning not only what they think about your proposal but also how they feel about it.
  • Ask really good questions to understand their point of view, what drives them and what are their goals.
  • Validate your thought process based on how they perceive it.

Develop WinWin Solutions

Reference : https://www.techtello.com/demystifying-negotiation/

10 Comments Add yours

    1. GS says:

      I am glad you liked the post. Influencing and negotiating are things we all try to do all the time. For instance, we want to influence our children to behave according to codes and values we feel are appropriate or we want our partners to choose the holiday we want.

      Like

  1. Being well-prepared is a necessary and important step with effective negotiations.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yes, Where possible prepare in advance. Consider what your needs are and the needs of the other person. Consider outcomes that would address more of what you both want. Commit yourself to a win/win approach, even if tactics used by the other person seem unfair. Be clear that your task will be to steer the negotiation in a positive direction.

      Like

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for the reblog.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Happy to share your post with followers, My Dear!
        xoxo
        😘💕🌹

        Liked by 1 person

  2. gpavants says:

    Hi Garima,

    How often is it easier to bypass these important skills because avoiding issues to some is easier? Great aspects of a healthy working environment.

    Thank you,

    Gary

    On Sun, Jul 19, 2020 at 11:33 AM Be Inspired..!! wrote:

    > GS posted: ” At any stage of your career—whether you are interviewing for > a job or already a leader at your company—strong negotiation skills are a > must. They also follow you from the workplace into other aspects of your > life. Negotiating with classmates about who wi” >

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Yes Gary. No employee wants to become embroiled in a workplace dispute. If conflict at work isn’t resolved, it can cause stress, frustration, loss of sleep, a bad temperament, illness or other issues for individual employees. Disputes can grow from the smallest of issues. Something as inconsequential as taking someone else’s lunch from the fridge can escalate into accusations of poor work performance. Once you have an impression of a colleague from a particular incident, you will look for other examples, however small, to reinforce that opinion. It’s important to acknowledge that squabbles will take place now and again and that they should stay at that level – minor disagreements that should be figured out and forgotten.

      Liked by 1 person

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