If You Want to Take Control of Your Life, Remove This One Word From Your Vocabulary

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There is no such thing as a half-measure.

We can choose to be very ambiguous about how we go about living our lives, but at the heart of it all, the words we use are crucial to how we go about things. The language we use to communicate with others and with ourselves. Our moods are a direct result of our thoughts and can guide our behaviour. It all comes down to language at its core. Because of this, we need to be careful about the words we choose to employ. Starting with the words we use, we may begin to truly take control over and responsibility for our lives. Some words convey responsibility, while others release us from it.

This one word serves as an illustration of responsibility dereliction. It’s important to eliminate it as much as you can from your lexicon whenever you can. That word is ‘try’. It may not seem essential to you, but trust me, it is. Every time I said, “I’ll try to make your event,” to myself or to someone else, I reflect on how I felt.
“I’ll work to improve next time,”
I’ll try to put in more effort on the following project.
“I’ll try to keep that in mind going forward.”
I sometimes followed through on what I claimed I was attempting to do, but I didn’t always.

I sometimes followed through on what I claimed I was attempting to do, but I didn’t always. Occasionally, even though I knew deep down that I most likely wouldn’t follow through, I would still say I’d try to give it my best shot. Yet you can see how I’m harming both myself and those around me. It would have been ideal if I had been up front about whether or not I could do the task, or if I had promised to do it and then forced myself to do it. The term “try” gives us a mental opening to break our promises to ourselves, therefore we must be honest with ourselves. We are aware of the reality, but our minds will use any means at their disposal to persuade us to forego the difficult tasks in favour of the simpler ones. “Sure, I said you would attempt to make that event, but I can’t be bothered to make the effort to get ready, take the trip, and go,” your mind might reply. Nevertheless, I didn’t say I would come for sure; I only stated I would attempt to. I tried to make it, but I doubt I’ll succeed. In the meantime, you probably didn’t put in quite as much effort as you had convinced yourself to make.

The word “tried” can deceive you into thinking you’ve worked hard when in reality you haven’t accomplished much. As a result, you are no longer held accountable for your actions and are kept in a cycle of mediocrity. Instead, you only need to ‘attempt’ to keep your promises. When we “tried,” society tends to excuse us from not being at our best. But if we weren’t at our best, it’s necessary to admit it, accept the agony of failure, and try harder the next time to make sure it doesn’t happen again. The rules of life are that you either do what you say you’ll do or want to do, or you don’t.

There isn’t any room in between those. If I don’t, it’s up to me to follow through the next time and do what I need to do, or face the consequences.
Just think of the difference when I say, “I will create your occasion.”
“Next time, I’ll do better.”
“I’ll put more effort into the next project,”
“I’ll keep that in mind in the future.”
Different weights exist. There is responsibility involved. Now that you’ve committed to doing something, the universe is testing your ability to follow through on your word.

This is why it’s crucial to stop using the word “try” in your vocabulary if you want to take control of your life. One of the unmistakable symptoms that you let your circumstances determine your actions rather than the other way around is if you consistently make promises that you don’t keep. You need to put in more effort if you want to be someone who creates change rather than someone who deceives themselves into believing they are. That is the reality.

Being great is overcoming obstacles and following through on your commitments, even if they are difficult, or realising your limitations, taking them into account, and improving both now and in the future. Being average is “trying” to follow through on your commitments, being aware of your limitations, and deluding yourself into thinking something is okay even when you know deep down that it isn’t. To continue to feel at ease with not acting on anything. Which do you desire to be?

Hi, I’m Garima and I write about life experiences. I have several books available on Amazon. Check them out today! Any purchases or KDP reads will be greatly appreciated. If you like my books, do leave a review. Here’s my author page on Amazon – https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B0BQDZXYNV

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14 Comments Add yours

  1. robertcday says:

    I’m going to do a search through my blog for the word ‘try’ to see if this is a problem for me. I suspect not. Still, it’s great advice. Thanks. 😃

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Way to go!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. sicetnon3 says:

    It seems Another half measure word is “if”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      In my opinion, if is a word that can either steer you in the right direction, or mislead you.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi, thank you for your article about “trying”. Doing and action and leaning towards what you imagine yourself to be is within the life lesson: you are what you focus on.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Thank you for taking time to read my post.

      Like

  4. I find another word that is also a “get out of jail free card”. It allows you to have reasons as to why you can’t do what is expected of you. Something where you don’t want to take ownership. It is another 3 letter word. BUT. Just sit back and listen to yourself and others for a time. There are so many “but’s in life. BUT I maybe wrong 😄🌻

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      Hahhahah BUT you are right!!! Striking for clarity and sincerity, particularly in written and digital communication, is critical and a worthwhile (if often futile) pursuit. Misunderstandings will always exist. Sentiment and tone are always misunderstood. Making small changes, such as being more aware of how words like “but” are used, can only help.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yup! (1 strikethrough 😄) I once had an experience at work where I used it to agree with someone and they thought I was being argumentative and shouting at them. Many apologies were needed and a more careful approach to future communication. At least there are emoji’s now 😄😄😄

        Liked by 1 person

      2. GS says:

        Emoji’s are life saving sometimes

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Indeed..!! 😊❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. GS says:

      🙌🙌

      Liked by 1 person

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